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Full text of "The Amherst papyri : being an account of the Egyptian papyri in the collection of the Right Hon. Lord Amherst of Hackney, F.S.A. at Didlington Hall, Norfolk"

THE AMHERST PAPYRI, 

BEING AN ACCOUNT OF 

THE EGYPTIAN PAPYRI IN THE COLLECTION OF 
THE RH.HT HON. LORD AMHE;!ST OF HACKNEY, F.S.A. 

AT 

DIDLINGTON HALT., NORFOLK, 

PERCY E. NEWBERRY. 



AN APPENDIX ON A COPTIC PAPYRUS, 



W. E. CRUxM, M.A 



WITH TWllNTY-rOUK AVTOTY. 'F. l'i..\TE.<. 



T.()ND'''M 

BERNARD QUAR'TCH, 15, 

181)0. 



'i. VDII.T.Y, W 



!ARY 

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
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http://www.archive.org/details/amherstpapyribeiOOamhe 






THE AMHERST PAPYRI, 

BEING AN ACCOUNT OF 

THE EGYPTIAN PAPYRI IN THE COLLECTION OF 
THE RIGHT HON. LORD AMHERST OF HACKNEY, F.S.A., 

AT 

DIDLINGTON HALL, NORFOLK, 

BY 

PERCY E. NEWBERRY. 



AN APPENDIX ON A COPTIC PAPYRUS, 



W. E. CRUM, M.A. 



WITH TWENTY-FOUR AUTOTYPE PLATES. 



LONDON 

BERNARD QUARITCH, 15, PICCADILLY, W. 

1899. 



HAERISON AND SONS, 

PBINTERS IN ORDmAKY TO HKK MAJESTY, 

ST. martin's lane, LONDON. 



TO 

THE EIGHT HO>'OURABLE 

VISCOUNT CROMER, 
G.C.B., GC.M.G., K.C.S.I., CLE., 

HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S AGENT AND CONSUL-GENERAL 

. IN 

EGYPT, 

AND A MINISTER PLENIPOTENTIARY IN HER MAJESTY'S DIPLOMATIC SERVICE, 

THIS VOLUME, 

WHICH HAS BEEN COMPILED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE DESIRE EXPRESSED BY HIS LORDSHIP, 

THAT THE CONTENTS OF THE PAPYRI EXISTING IN PRIVATE COLLECTIONS IN 

THIS COUNTRY, AS WELL AS OF THOSE IN PUBLIC MUSEUMS, 

SHOULD BE MADE KNOWN FOR THE BENEFIT 

OF STUDENTS OF EGYPTIAN 

ANTIQUITIES, 

IS MOST RESPECTFULLY 

DEDICATED. 



PREFACE. 



The title of this volume, ^^ An Account 
of the Egyptian Papyri in ike Collection 
of Lord Amherst of Hackney" sufficiently 
explains its purport. 

I wish here to acknowledge my sincerest 
thanks to Lord and Lady Amherst, for 
having allowed me to delay the publica- 
tion of this book for many months. Its 
preparation has required much preliminary 
study, and has necessitated my reading 
through most of the ancient documents 



already published, as well as many of those 
preserved in the Museums of Europe and 
Egypt, A\hich are, as yet, unpublished. 

The proofs have been read through by 
my friend Wilhelm Spiegelberg, Professor 
of Egyptology in the L^niversity of 
Strassburg, but, of course, he is in no 
way responsible for any errors that may 
be found in the work ; to him I wish to 
express my gratitude for much help and 
many valuable suggestions. 



PERCY E. NEWBERRY 



October \st, 1899. 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTION :— 



I. LiTERAEY PaPYBI 

II. Legal Papyri . 

III. Harem Conspiracy . 

IV. Geographical Papyrus 
V. Miscellaneous Papyri 

VI. Religious Papyri 



9 
10 
11 
14 
14 
15 



CATALOGUE. 

A. Early Literary Fragments 

B. Legal Papyri 

C. Geographical Papyrus 

D. Mythical Papyrus .... 

E. AcCOUiNTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PaPYRI 

F. Religious Papyri : Books of the Dead 

G. Demotic Papyri 
H. Demotic and Greek Papyri 

I. Greek Papyri .... 

J. Coptic Papyri .... 

K. Coptic and Arabic Papyri 

APPENDIX : A Coptic Will, by W. E. Crum, M.A. 



17 
19 
44 
47 
48 
50 
54 
55 
56 
56 
56 

57 



INTRODUCTION. 



The treasures of Egyptian Art and 
Literature gathered together by Lord and 
Lady Amherst of Hackney, and preserved 
at Didhngton Hall, Norfolk, form, if not 
the most extensive, one of the most impor- 
tant, private collections of the kind in this 
country. Many of the objects are of 
unique interest. The series of mummy 
cases, the bronzes, the amulets and ushabti 
figures are particularly noteworthy, and the 
collection of monuments from the historic 
site of Tell el Amama is of unsurpassed 
interest. But there is another class of 
antiquities at Didlington Hall which is 
perhaps the most important of the whole 
collection : it is the series of Egyptian 
papyri dating from the Middle Kingdom 
period of Egyptian history {circa 2500 B.C.) 
and extending down to Arab times. 

The nucleus of this valuable collection 



of papyri was the small seiies, numbering 
some five documents, foraied by the late 
Dr. Lee and purchased by Lord Amherst 
of Hackney, with the entire collection of 
that learned Doctor, about the year 1868. 
From that date till the present time it has 
been gradually added to, and now there 
are some two hundi-ed dijQferent papyri 
in the Didlington Hall museum. The 
collection includes not merely the religious 
documents which are so common in mu- 
seums, but hterary, legal and other papyri. 
It comprises specimens of Hieroglyphic, 
Hieratic and Demotic writing, as well as 
of Greek, Coptic and Arabic. Of these, 
twenty Demotic and Greek papyii of the 
second century B.C. were found together 
in an earthernware jar near Thebes ; three 
of the Demotic documents contain dockets 
wi'itten in Greek, and these may be ex- 



( viii ) 



pected to be of considerable help in the i selves, contain references to persons and 



decipherment of the Demotic character. 

The Amherst papyri are of very great 
importance for several reasons ; among 
them are certain fragments which enable 
us to complete, or partially complete, docu- 
ments in other collections. Others there 
are which, complete or almost so in them- 



events recorded in papyri and monuments 
in other collections. The series of chapters 
from the Book of the Dead, of which there 
are parts of copies made for no less than 
twenty-four individuals, is also of consider- 
able interest, containing as it does some 
eighty-four chapters. 



THE AMHERST PAPYRI. 



Papyri Nos. I, II and IV are fragments of a 
series of early literary documents discovered 
many years ago in some locality, perhaps 
Thebes, in Upper Egypt. The main part of 
the "find" was brought to England in 1840, 
where it was purchased by Prof. Lepsius for 
the Berlin Museum, and the papyri of which it 
was composed (four in number) were soon 
after (in 1842) published by him in fac-simile. 
The first of these, known as the Berlin Papyrus 
No. I, contains the celebrated story of Sanehat, 
and describes the fate of an exile among the 
Syrian bedawin. The tale is simple and homely, 
and written in a semi-poetic style. It was one 
of the most popular of ancient Egyptian stories, 
and was widely read for centuries, a copy of 
part of it having been written as late as the 
XXth dynasty {circa 1000 B.C.). 

The second and fourth papyri of the Berlin 
series contain copies of one and the same tale, 
which is also very simple in character. It 
tells of a quarrel between a peasant and a 
townsman, which purports to have happened 
at Henenseten or Herakleopolis, now Ahnas, 
a little south of the Fayum. The third papy- 
rus of the series (Berlin Papyrus No. Ill) 
contains a remarkable dialogue between a man 
and his ghost. Curiously enough, although the 
papyri are of great length, not one of these 
four documents is complete ; they all want the 
outer coils or more of the rolls. There are 



fragments of three of these papyri (Berlin Nos. 
I, II and IV) in the Amherst Collection. Wlien 
and where Lord Amherst procured them is un- 
fortunately not certain, but it seems probable 
that they were obtained with the collections 
of Mr. Lieder of Cairo in the year 1861. An 
account of the fragments was published by 
Mr. Griffith in the Proceedings of the Societi/ 
of Biblical Archccology for 1892, but they are 
published in fac-simile for the first time on 
Plate I of this Catalogue. They number in 
all sixteen pieces, of which five belong to the 
Berlin Papyrus No. I, five to the Berlin Papy- 
rus No. II, and two to the Berlin Papyrus No. 
VI. The remaining four fragments perhaps 
formed part of the outer coil of No. III. 

The text of the two stories contained in tlie 
Berlin Papyri Nos. I, II and IV, has been tran- 
scribed from the original documents in the 
Berlin Museum, and translations of them have 
been made by several Egyptologists. For the 
beginning of the talc of Sanehat the reader is 
referred to Prof. Maspero's publication of the 
XXth dynasty ostraca in the 1st Memoir of the 
Institid Egyptien of Cairo, and to Mr. Griffith's 
reconstruction of the text in the style of the 
original from the Amhei-st fragments, in the 
Proceedings of the Society of Biblical Arche- 
ology, Vol. XIV. The text of the Berlin Papy- 
rus No. I is best transcribed in Prof. Maspero's 
edition, printed in the Melanges d'Archeologie 
Egyptiennc, 111,68, 140, but it requires consider- 
able revision. The most trustworthy English 



( 10 ) 



translation of the whole story is that gisen in 
Prof. Petrie's Egyptian Tales (1st Series), p. 
97. The Storv of the Peasant has only been 
partially translated, and some account of it 
may be found in the same volume oi Egyptian 
Tales, p. 61. It may be of interest to give here 
an outline of the two stories, the beginnings of 
which are preserved in the Amherst ffagments. 

The Tale of Saxehat tells of an Egyptian's 
wanderings in neighbouring lands about 2500 
years befoi'e the Christian era. The Prince 
Usertsen, returning to Eg}-pt from an expedi- 
tion against the Libyans, is met on tlie road 
by a messenger with the news of the death 
of his father, the king Amenemhat I. The 
message is overheard by Sanehat, an officer 
of high position at the Egyptian court, and 
he is straightway driven involuntarily to 
take to flight. He deserts the army and 
travelling southwards arrives at a town called 
Negau: then, joui-neying in a north-easterly 
dLrection, he arrives at the frontier, which he 
ci'osses' at nightfall. Overcome by Imnger, 
thirst and fatigue, he is given food by a 
friendly Bedawi, who introduces him to his 
camp. He wanders on till he readies Kedrm, 
where he spends " half a year ; " but the prince 
of a neighbouring land invites Sanehat to 
settle in his dominions. He accepts : soon gains 
honours and fortune and marries the prince's 
daughter. Sanehat, however, still retains the 
Egyptian's love of the land of his bu'th, and 
when advanced in years obtains permission 
from Usertsen, the king then reigning, to 
return to Egypt. He returns and is received 
at the Pharaoh's court with honour and pre- 
sented to the queen. Sanehat concludes his 
life in great prosperity and is, moreover, 
granted the supreme blessing of a splendid 
sepulchre. 

The Story of the Peasant, recounting a 
quarrel between a countryman and a towns- 
man, is said to have been enacted at or near 
Henenseten or Herakleopolis, the modem 



Ahnas. The period must have been the IXth 
or Xth dynasty, when Henenseten was the seat 
of government. A peasant coming to market 
from a remote part of the country is robbed of 
his asses and goods by an artisan or towns- 

I man. He complains of the injustice done him 
before the Chief Steward Merul-tensa, and 
shows such courage and perseverance in his 

I complaints that he channs the latter. The 

I Chief Steward, indeed, is so delighted with the 
originality of his pleading, that, with the assent 
of the monarch under whom he serves, he 

: prolongs the peasant's affair in order thus to 
prompt him to further discourse. In the end 
the peasant wins his case, his goods are given 
back to him together with those of the towns- 
man, which the king has confiscated. The 
tale LS very Eg}-ptian in character and is most 
realistically and simply told. 



II. 



The Yth papyrus of the Collection refers to a 
great harem conspiracy ogainst the life of 
Eamses III, of which two other documents, one 
in Turin and one in Paris, give us infomiation. 
It appears that certain persons belonging to 
the royal household had conspired against the 
king and planned an open rebellion. As in 
similar cases at the present day, the harem 
formed the centre of the conspiracy. One of 
the oldest inmates Ti, had a son named 
Pentaur, and she with another lady of the 
harem conspired together with the object of 
placing him upon the throne. Many of the 
officials of the women's apartments appear 
also to have been inculpated in the con- 
spiracy. Among them was the Chief Steward 
Pai-bak-kamen, a man of great importance 
to the conspirators in the harem, for 
through him they were enabled to correspond 
with the outside world. " He carried their 
words," runs the account, "' to their mothers 



( n ) 



and brothers outside the harem." These rela- 
tives of the harem inmates were ordered to 
excite the people and goad on their friends to 
begin hostilities against the king. That they 
had much sympathy from the outside seems 
certain, as the captain of the Ethiopian troops 
and several other high officials are mentioned 
as having been won over to the conspiracy. 
They thought it right to use every means 
to do harm to the sovereign and even magic 
arts were invoked. It is to the trial of one 
of these magicians that the Amherst Papyrus 
No. V refers. A certain "overseer of the 
cattle," named Penhuiban, procured a magical 
roll from the king's own library, and according 
to directions in it he made certain wax figures 
and love charms which were smuggled into 
the palace in order to cause blindness and 
paralyze certain of its unfriendly inmates. 
Fortunately another page of this interesting 
document is preserved in Paris. It states 
that the individual who received the wax 
figures ' and charms was the Chief Steward 
Pai-bak-kamen. His examination before the 
police court is given, and it is further stated 
that sentence of death was passed upon him — 
death by his own liand. It is very interesting 
to note the impartiality of Pharaoh, in this 
case against his own person. He held alto- 
gether aloof from the trial, and as he says in 
the opening of the case, " as to the talk which 
men hold I know it not." He ordered the 
judges however to find out the truth, and to 
punish the guilty, but to beware of inflicting 
chastisement upon those who did not deserve it. 
A study of all documents relating to the 
trial was published by M. Deveria in the 
Journal Asiati que for 1865,'"' but this transla- 

* Reprinted in Maspero's Bibliotheque ilgyptologique. 
Tome 5, pp. 97-251. 



tion of the Turin papyrus refen-ing to the case 
has been considerably improved by Prof Pienonf 
in the eighth volume of the Records of the Past 
(1st Series). An account of the conspiracy has 
also appeared from the pen of Dr. Adolf Erraan 
in the ^gyptische Zeitschri/t, 1879, 76 ff*. {cf. 
his JBgypten, p. 142). 



III. 



Another great trial of a somewhat later 
period is referred to in the Amherst Papyrus 
No. VI. Towards the end of the XXth 
dynasty (about 1100 B.C.), it appears that the 
police authorities of Thebes had great difii- 
culty in preventing the tombs of the western 
necropolis from being entered by bands of 
robbers, and their contents fi-om being stolen. 
Several documents relating to the work of 
the police at the time are preserved, which 
throw considerable light upon the way crime 
was tracked, and how the trials of suspected 
persons were conducted. Among them the 
most interesting is that known as the Abbott 
Papyrus, in the British Museum, which was 
purchased in 1856 by the Trustees of that 
institution from Dr. Abbott of Cairo. It is 
of a fine quality, almost white in colomr, and in 
excellent condition ; the handwriting is also 
very clear and bold. It records a certain official 
examination consequent on injuries or thefts 
perpetrated in the tombs or chapels of ten 
monarchs of the Xlth, Xlllth and XVIHth 
dynasties. Out of these ten royal tombs nine 
were found uninjured ; the tenth, belonging 
to a monarch of the Xlllth dynasty, was found 
broken into and looted. The result of the 
examination of this tomb is recorded in full 
by the scribe and is given here : — 



B 2 



( 12 ) 
TRANSCKIPTION. 



III I 



**^'-"-k ^ 



^iiip^^]^k-^P4i:ij 



dii^ 






111 TTi^ 



vi2> n ("^a 



6-\ll^^(?eL=.,T,ro.iiu^ 



y^ 



^ 



^ m 



r^ '-^•^ ^=^=' 

V L^ oi 



e 111 



7. '?x ! 



■e I 



:}ZirZ\^<\-].lili 



Transliteration. 

1. pa mer ne seten ( Iid-seJJiew-§hed-tani )\ diikh itza 
senb sa Rd (Sebek-em-sau-ef )\ dnkh uca senb. 

2. su geiny cm teliay set na dzau em baku kherti cm pa 
neferu nc payef 

3. mer em ta usehht ne bu-nu-re ne ta da-mer dhd ne 
■mo- shenuli Neb-Ainen ne seten ( Rd-men-kheper )| 
dnhh uza senb 

i. gemy ta dst hres ne pa seten sliutdm neb set henu 
ta dst krcs ne hemt seten urt 

5. ( Nub-khA-es )| dnkh uza senb tayef hemt seten dii 

fill/ na dzau det rent dryu zat 
G. na serii ubau semeti ref gemy pa sekher ne fu det 

rem d iiru 

7. na dza er pai seten liend tayef hemt seten. 



Translation. 

1. " The tomb of king Ra-sekliem-slietl-taui, 
L.P.Ii! sou of lla, Sebek-em-saii-ef L.P.H! 

2. *' It was found that the thieves had entered it 
by uudermming the principal cliamber of the 

o. "monument from tlie outer chamber of the 
tomb of the superintendent of the granaries Neb- 
Ameu of king Ra-men-kheper TThothmes III] 
L.P.H. ! 

4. " The grave of the king was found to be 
without its lord : so also was the grave of the 
great royal wife 

5. " Nub-kha-es, his royal spouse ; the thieves had 
laid hands on them. 

0. "The vezir, the nobles and stewards investigated 
the matter and found the thieves having laid 
hands on them, a fact, 

7. "as far as the king and his royal wife were 
concerned." 



( 13 ) 



Such is the official account given of the 
examination of the tomb. From the Amherst 
Papyrus No. VI it appears that there were 
eight thieves concerned, and they were nearly 
all servants of the temple of Amen. It will 
be observed also, as Prof. Erman has pointed 
out, that a stone-cutter was amongst the num- 
ber, and perhaps it was he who had made the 
underground passage to the tomb described in 
the Abbott Papyrus. The record of their trial 
and confession is of extreme interest, and is 
given in full in the Amherst document. Having 
been, as was the custom for suspects, beaten on 
their hands and feet with sticks, they confessed 
that they had made their way into the tomb 
and found the bodies of the king and queen 
there. Their confession runs : — 

[" The tomb of the king Sebekemsauf and] 
of the royal wife Nub-kha-es his wife. The 
tomb was surrounded by masonry closed up 
with stones and covered over with kJiesh-hhesJi. 
This we broke through and found in it the 
royal mummies. We opened their coffins and 
the wrappings which were on them, and we 
found many amulets and necklaces of gold. 
The head of the king was covered with gold 
and the mummy was adorned with gold 
throughout. 

"The wrappings were of gold and silver 
within and without, and covered with every 
kind of precious stone. We tore oflP the gold 
that we found, together with all the amulets 
and necklaces which were on his neck and the 
wrappings on which they la}-. 

" We found the mummy of the royal wife 
also, and we took all that which we found 
from it, and we set fire to their wi-appiugs 
and we took all their funerary furniture con- 
sisting of vessels of gold, silver and copper. 
We divided all this into eight pieces [among 
our eight selves]." 

Of the eight thieves, the names of five are 
preserved. These were, with one exception, 
all servants of officials of the temple of Amen. 



By trade one, as before mentioned, was a stone- 
cutter, another was a labourer in the service of 
an overseer of the huntsmen, the third was a 
husbandman from Karnak, the fourth a water- 
carrier of the Kenau of king Thothmes IV, and 
the fifth a soldier (?). 

The public confession was not enough ; the 
thieves were also obliged to identify the scene 
of their crime. "On the 19th day of the 3rd 
month of the summer season of the 16th year" 
(of Ramses IXth's reign), runs the text, "the 
thieves were taken before the governor and 
wazir Kha-em-uas and his lieutenant, and in 
their presence they were ordered to identify 
the tomb" to which their confession refen'ed. 
Their guilt being finally established, the wazir 
and his officer sent in their official report to 
the king, for it seems that a law forbade the 
governor and his court to pass sentence upon 
tomb violators. The criminals were meanwhile 
handed over to the high priest of Amen to be 
confined in the prison temple " with their fellow 
thieves." The sentence passed upon them is 
not recorded, but we can well believe that, 
like other miscreants of the period, they were 
condemned to death, probably by the most 
ignominious punishment then known — death 
by their own hand. 

Another important trial of robbers took place 
in the seventeenth year of Ramses IXth's reign, 
and the court consisted of the same wazir and 
officers. This was a case of robbery of gold, 
silver and copper at Thebes. It is recorded 
in the Papyrus Harris A, tracings of which 
are now preserved at Didlington Hall." Dated 
in the " 17th year, the 1st month of the spring 
season, the day 5," it gives a list of the names 
of the thieves, whose trade, occupation or pro- 
fession is in every instance noted. The court 
of the wazii- consisted of the governor himself 
Kha-em-uas, the high priest of Amen, Araen- 



• These tracings preserve some 41 lines whicli are not 
now to be found iu the document iji the British Museum. 



( 14 ) 



hetep, the prince Paser,* the chief scribe of the 
auditors Un-nefer, and the chief foreman User- 
Khepesh. The wazir Kha-em-uas is, as we have 
seen, mentioned in several other documents. 
The prince Paser appears in the great trial 
recorded in the Abbott Papyrus, and the name 
of the foreman User-Khepesh in other docu- 
ments preserved in the British Museum, at 
Liverpool and in Turin. 

Among the prisoners were merchants, scribes, 
weavers, metal workers and other artificers, 
guards, peasants, water-carriers, bakers and 
oil-boilers, slaves, washermen, canal-workers, a 
barber, several seamstresses and other Theban 
women, a gardener and a captain of Nubian 
soldiers. Most of these people were inhabi- 
tants of eastern Thebes, and were employed 
in the service of the high priest of Amen or 
served in the temple of Amen. Others belonged 
to the temple buildings of the kings, such as to 
the Kendu or to the temple of Amenhetep III, 
or to the temples of Thothmes I, of Seti I or 
Ramses III. Several held posts in the royal 
granary or granaries of the temple of Amen or 
of Khonsu. Many of the criminals lived in the 
necropolis on the western bank of the river. 
Several were from the Fayum ; others were 
attached to the service of the god Sebek of 
Atur in the Fayum, of Khnum of Elephantine, 
and of Mentu of Erment. 



IV. 



The "Vlllth papyrus of the Amherst Collection 
belongs to a great treatise on the Geograjohy 
of Egypt and the FayAm written in the 
Ptolemaic period, perhaps under Ptolemy 
Euergetes II. It is doubtful however whether 
it originally formed part of the roll of the 



* Lord Amberst possesses the lower part of an ushahti 
figure inscribed with this prince's name. 



great Fay dm papyrus, portions of which are 
preserved in the Gizeh Museum, in Austria 
and in England, or whether it formed another 
volume of the same book. The latter supposi- 
tion would seem most probable, for the scattered 
parts from Gizeh, Vienna and Lincoln have 
recently been fitted together by M. Lanzoui of 
Turin, and the document appears to present no 
gaps. The Amherst Papyrus No. VIII how- 
ever is of the same date, and is written in 
the same handwriting. It enumerates the 
various names or provinces of Egypt in their 
geographical order, and gives a figure of the 
crocodile-god Sebek, as the local divinity of 
each. It also gives a representation of the 
temple and acacia tree of Neith, which it is 
stated was situated " at the side of " the 
temple of Sebek, Lord of Ri-seh. 



Of the miscellaneous papyri but three call for 
special notice. No. IX, of which unfortunately 
only part of the first two pages and the last 
lines of three others remain, related to the 
legend of the goddess Astarte. Had it been 
complete it would perhaps have been the most 
valuable document of the whole collection. But 
little can now be rescued from it. It mentions 
Astarte as the " little one of Ptah," and the 
early part referred to some god or other person 
who bore the tribute of the sea. This tribute 
is further stated to have consisted of silver, 
gold, lapis lazuli and wood. 

Papyrus No. X, of which only two fragments 
remain, is written in the beautiful hieratic 
writing characteristic of the middle kingdom. 
The smaller fragment names a certain Sebek- 
hetep ; the larger mentions domestic animals, 
flax, beads. It probably formed part of some 
official account-book like the Great Account 
Papyrus of the Gizeh Museum (Boulac 
Papyrus, No. 18). 



( 15 ) 



The two fragments of Papyrus No. XI 
belong to the series of accounts of the time 
of Seti I preserved in the Museum of the 
Louvre, and published by Dr. Spiegelberg in 
his Rechnunrjcn axis der Zeit Sell I. 



VI. 



The series of Books of the Dead preserved at 
Didlingtou Hall represents co2:)ies of various 
chajjters written for twenty-four individuals, 
several of Avhom bore titles of high rank. 
Among them occur one for a guard of the 
treasury, another for a chief librarian of the 
king, a third for a superintendent of the royal 
granaries. Several name musicians attached to 
the service of the temple of Amen. Others 
were written for priests of Amen-Ea, Ra, 
Khonsu and other deities. They were pro- 
bably all found in the necropolis of Thebes, but 
the origin of one of tliem is alone certain. 
This is Papyrus No. XXXV, the first half of 
which is now preserved in the British Museum. 
This latter part was purchased from the Salt 
Collection, and is stated to have come from 
Thebes. It measures eighteen inches wide and 
about sixteen feet in length. It is one of the 
finest hieratic copies of the Book of the Dead 
in existence. 

List of the Chapters* of the Booh of the Dead, 
of ivhich complete coiiies, or parts of copies, 
arc preserved amoiuj the Amherst Papyri. 

CHAPTEB 

I in Papyri Nos. XVI, XVII, XXXVI. XXXVIII. 
VII .. .. XXXIV, XXXVI. 
VIII in Papyrus Xo. XXXI. 
IX ,. .. XXXIV. 
XI iu Papyri Nos. XXII, XXXVI. 
XII ,. „ XXII, XXXIV. 



* I hare adopted the s3stcm of numbering the ehnptcra employed 
by Lepsius in his edition of the Todtcnhuch. This is also tlio fystem 
employed by Narillo and Budge. 



CHAPIEE 






XIII iu 


Papyrus Xo 


. XXII. 


XV in 


Papyri Nos 


XXIII,XXIV,XXXIV,XXXVI 


XVI in 


Papyrus Xo 


XXXVI. 


XVII 


., ,, 


XVII. 


XVIII in 


Papyri Nos 


XXIV, XXVIII, XXXVI. 


XXVII in 


Papyrus No 


. XXXIV. 


XXVIII 


,, ,, 


XXXIV. 


XXXII 


■) M 


XXV. 


XXXIII 


1! 


XXV. 


XXXVII 


,, ^, 


XXII. 


XXXVIII 


') 


XXII. 


XLI ill 


Papyri Xos 


XXII, XXV. 


XLTI 


„ ,, 


XVI, XXV 


XLVI iu 


Papyrus X'o 


XXXI. 


XLVIII 


„ ,. 


XVIII. 


LI 




XVIII. 


LIV 


,, 


XVI. 


LVII 




XVI. 


LVIII 


'T ., 


XVI. 


LXI 


,, „ 


XVI. 


LXIII in 


Papyri N'os. 


XVI, XXV. 


LXVII in 


Papyrus No 


XVI. 


LXXV 


., J, 


XVI. 


LXXVI 


• • 


XVIII. 


LXXVII in 


Papyri Nos 


XXV, XXVII. 


LXXIX iu 


Papyrus Nu 


XXII. 


LXXXII in 


Papyri No.s 


XVIII, XXV. 


LXXXV in 


Papyrus No 


. XXV. 


LXXXVI 




XXV. 


LXXXVII iu 


Papyii N(js 


XVIII, XXV. 


.XXXVIII iu 


Papyrus No 


XXV. 


LXXXIX in 


Pai)yri No? 


XXIII, XXV. 


XCI 




XVII, XXII. 


XCII 


., 


XVII, XXII. 


XCIIt 




XVII, XXII. 


XCIV in 


Pajiynis No 


XXII. 


XUVIII 


,, 


XXV. 


XGIX iu 


Pajjyri Nos 


XVI, XXV. 


cv 


„ ,, 


XVI, XVII, XXV. 


CVIII iu 


Papyrus No 


XXII. 


CIX 


It •< 


XXII. 


CX in 


Papyri Nos. 


XVII, XXX, XXXII, XXXV. 


CXI in 


Papyrus No 


. XXXV. 


CXIII 


,. 


XXXV. 


CXIV 




XXXV. 


CXV 


r •> 


XXXV. 


CXVII 


., 


XXXV. 


CXVIII 


•! 


XXXV. 


CXIX 


,, ,. 


XXXV. 


cxx 




XXXV. 


CXXI in 


Papyri Nos 


XVII, XXV, XXXV. 


CXXII in 


Papyrus No 


XXXV. 



If, ) 



CHAPTEE 








CHAPTBE 


CXXIV in Papyrus No. XVII. 






CXLVIII in Papyri Nos. XXXIV, XXXV. 


CXXV in Papyri 


Nos. XVI, XVII 
XXXV. 


XXI, 


XXXIV, 


CXLIX „ „ XVI, XX, XXXIV. 
CL in Papyrus No. XXXIV. 


CXXVI in Papyrus No. XXXV. 






CLI „ „ XXXIV. 


CXXVII 


XVI. 






CLII in Papyri Nos. XVI, XXXIV, XXXV 


CXXVIII 


XXXV. 






CLIV „ „ XXXIV, XXXV. 


CXXIX 


XXXV. 






CLV in Papyrus No. XXXV. 


CXXXII 


XXXV. 






CLVII in Papyri Nos. XXXIV, XXXV. 


cxxxv 


XXXV. 






CLVIII in Papyrus No. XXXV. 


CXXXVI 


XVII. 






CLIX in Papyri Nos. XXXIV, XXXV. 


CXXXVII in Papyri 


Xos. XVI, XVII, 


XXXV 




CLIX bis in Papyrus No. XXXV. 


CXXXVIII in Papyrus 


No. XXXV. 






CLXI in Papyri Nos. XXXIV. XXXV. 


CXLI 


XVIII. 






CLXII in Papyrus No. XXXIV. 


CXLIV in Papyri 


E^os. XVI, XVII. 






CLXIII „ „ XXXIV. 


CXLV „ 


XVI, XVII, 


XXII, 


XXXIV. 


CLXIV ., „ XXXIV. 


CXLVI 


XIX, XXXIV. 




CLXV in Papyri Nos. XXII, XXXIV. 



HffiROGLYPHIC AND HIERATIC PAPYRI. 

A. EAELY LITERARY FRAGMENTS. 



)< 



PAPYRUS No. I. 

(Plate I. A-E.) 

Five fragments written in the bold hieratic 
writing characteristic of the Middle Kingdom. 
They originally formed part of the outer roll of 
a great papyrus said to have been found at 
Thebes and now preserved in the Berlin 
Museum (Papyrus No. 3023, published in L.D. 
vi, 108-110). The fragments measure in 
height and width respectively : — A. 6 inches 
by o^ inches. B. 5 inches by 2 inches. C. 5j 



inches by 3|- inches. D. If inches by li 
inches. E. 2f inches by 2 inches. 

Transcription. 
In the following transcription the restorations 
have been made from the parallel text of the 
Butler Papyrus in the British Museum. From 
that text it appears that the first two lines of 
the tale are destroyed in the Amherst copy. The 
ends of the third to the tenth horizontal lines 
are preserved, but as they only give various 
determinatives for the names of products of 
the Sekhet Hemat, they are iiot given in the 
transcription. Lines 11-14 are destroyed : the 
text therefore begins with 1. 15 : — 



^ 



D 111 I— I 



J^n^ ^ 



^ ^ ^ =f« ^ = (j^ f1 s h r •^ 

^ J s^ 1 oV M fl ^ 1^ ^ r. 1 - -^ L 

^ 1- i ^ ^ r v; ^ - i ^ p a^ ^ T w 

*»» p- :r s V o , i ^,,. i q^ (\-^ U (|^ J m 



3S I 



® ^ ^ S ^ ^ Ll ^ 



a 



"' X ^' 






w 



D 



1, 

fecial 



a C^ I A I 1 



a 
III ^"-^ 

I I AA/VAAA fwC'h ^ I 



fl\ 



i w n 



a «=> I r— ~i 









\\ I I /vw«\ ^ I 



Til 



15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27., 28. 29. 30. 31. 



Fragment A. 



Fraffment B. 



Fra^meut 0. 



Fragments D and E. 



( 18 ) 



Transliteration. 



15. em dnu neb nefer ne Sehhet-Hemat 

16. [sAem<] pu dr ne Sekhti pen em khent- 

17. [yt] er Henen-seten, sper pyii dr nef er u ne per 

18. Fefd, her mehii em dena, gem nef se dm aha 
ly. her mer?/[t], Hemti ren ef, sa \_se pu Asrii~\ 

20. ren ef, zet pu net mer per iir Merui-ten[sa zed an'] 

21. Hemti pen maa ef da ne Sekhti pen 

22. dabyu her dh ef, zed ef, ha [_nd sheps nel>] 

23. [inen'lkh dua [henu ne Sekhti pen] 

24. dm ef! dst ref dr per Hemti pen her sema-ta 
[?ie re ne] 

25. uat kens pu, nen usekh, as pu qe7i[ef] 

26. er sekhu ne ry, du uat ef udt kher mu \_ket] 

27. \jf\ef uat ef resi zed an Hemti p>en \_ne shemsu ef] 

28. [as ! dn-nd dfd em perui ; dn dm-ef her-d ;] 

29. [aha ne seshem nef pa dfd her p]a sema-ta ne re 
uat 

30. Hn dn khenen [sedeh ef her] mu nep>nept [ef] 

'61. [her] resi. du dn [o-ef Sekhti pen] her uat net retji 
[2,2 neU\. 

Translation. 

15. With all the good products of the Sekhet- 
Hemat. 

16. The said Sekhti [journeyed] southwards 

17. to Henen-seten and when he came to the 
land belonging to the house of 

18. Fefa on the north of the dyke he found a man 
there standing 

19. upon the bank, whose name was the Hemti 
son [of a man named Asry] 

20. a serf of the chief steward Meruiten[sa. Said] 

21. this Hemti when he saw the asses of [this] 
Sekhti 

22. which pleased him, said he, " May [every ex- 
cellent image (of a god)] 

23. rob the [goods of the Sekhti] 

24. from him ! " Now the Hemti's house was at 
the bank [of the tow] 

25. path (?) which was narrow, but not broad ; it 
would amount 

26. to the width of a girdle; one edge of the road 
had water, the [other] 

27. side had corn. Said the Hemti [to his servant 

28. "Hasten! bring me a square chest from the 
house; " it was brought thence 

29. immediately; then he opened the chest at] the 
bank of the tow path (?) 

30. and it rested with [its cover on] the water and 
[its] nepnept 

31. [on] the com. 

Now [the Sekhti] came along the path used 
by all men . . . ." 



>c 



PAPYRUS No. II. 
(Plate I. F. G.) 

Two fragments of a second text of the Story 
of the Peasant which do not appear to belong 
to either of the Berlin copies. The writing 
upon them is hieratic of the Middle Kingdom, 
and somewhat like the hand of Papyrus No. I. 
They are probably from the Lieder Collection. 



PAPYRUS No. III. 

(Plate I. H-L.) 



^ 



Four fragments written in a similar hand- 
writing to Papyri Nos. I and II. They perhaps 
belong to a literary work now destroyed ; the 
largest fragment only measures 2f inches high 
by 2 inches in width. 



PAPYRUS No. IV. 



■sC.. 



(Plate I. M-Q.) 

Five fragments originally forming part of 
the outer roll of Papyrus No. I of the Berlin 
Museum, and containing parts of the first lines 
of the celebrated Story of Sanehat. The writing 
is hieratic of the Middle Kingdom. They were 
probably obtained together with Papyri Nos. I, 
II and III. The fragments measure in height 
and width respectively: — M, If inches by 1 inch. 
N, 2^ inches by 3 inches. 0, 1 inch by ^ inch. 
P, 5 inches by if inches. Q, 1 i inches by 1 inch. 

It would have been impossible to identify 
these fragments as belonging to the Berlin 
Papyrus No. I, had no other copy of the tale 
existed. Prof, Maspero was fortunate enough 
to discover in 1881, in a tomb at Thebes, a late 
hieratic ostracon (XXth dynasty), which on 
examination was found to contain a copy of the 
beginning of the Sanehat story. The text was 
afterwards published by Maspero and, although 
it Is veiy corrupt, it enables us to ascertain the 
exact position of the Amherst fragments. Niun- 



( 19 ) 



bering backwards from the beginning of the 
Berlin Papyrus, the lines in the Amherst frag- 
ments may be designated as 16, 15 ; 12, 11, 10, 
9,8; 4, 3, 2, 1 ; the last almost joins the Berlin 
manuscript. 

In the first fragment (Plate I, M) the hieratic 
signs are too mutilated to be decipherable ; but 
in 1. 15 there are the signs ffP^^'O'l 1^1 
belonging to the cartouche of Amenerahat I 
r© P ^^ "O"!!. In the second fragment (lettered 
N) are parts of five lines (11. 12-8). 

i2-IWi[->]kili°iT^ 



The third fragment (lettered 0) contains only 
three signs ; on the fourth and fifth (lettered 
P. Q) are remains of four lines. 



a© 



7^, I I I 



11. 


aiii^rr 


10. 


li^TlJ 


9. 


IEP<i>^t 



© 






.^:& 



2. is too mutilated to decipher. 



By the help of these fragments and Prof. 
Maspero's late ostracon, an attempt to recon- 
struct the text in the style of the ancient 
papyrus has been made by IMr. F. LI. Griffith. 
It is to be found in the Proceedings of the 
Society of Biblical ArchcBolog^j, Yol. XIV, p. -152. 



B. LEGAL PAPYRI. 



PAPYRUS No. V. (TuE Li£E Papybus.) 

{Vide Plates II and III.) 

Fragments of two pages of a papyrus con- 
taining an abstract of criminal proceedings 
dealing with a case of sorcery, written in a 
beautiful hieratic handwriting of the XXth 
dynasty {circa Ramses III). 

This papyrus was bought by Dr. Lee at 
Mr. Burton's sale {Ilartwell House Catalogue, 
No. 430), and purchased by liord Amherst of 
Hackney with Dr. Lee's Egyptian collection 
about 1868. The fragments were then mounted 
and arranged as in Dr. Lee's fac-simile {I.e. 
PI. II), but were placed in their right order in 
1892 by the present writer. The document was 
first fac-similed by S. Shavpe {Egypliaa In- 
scriptions, Second Series, Pis. LXXXVII-VIII) 
in 1855, and three years later Dr. Lee gave a 



lithographic reproduction of it in his Hartwell 
House Catalogue (PL II). In 1800, Chabas 
published a transcription and study of the text 
in his essay on Le Papyrus Magiqxie Harris 
(pp. 169-173), and in 1865, T. Deveria gave 
an account of it in tlie Journal Asiatique, No, 9, 
with a reproduction of Sharpe's fac-simile.*' A 
short notice has also been given of it by Prof. 
Erman {Zeitschrifl fiir Aegyptische sprachc, 
1879, pp. 76 ff.), and by Dr. Spiegelberg in 
his valuable essay on Egyptian law {Studien 
und Materialien zum Rechtsvesen des Pharao- 
nenreiches dcr Dynast XVIII-XXI, p. 132). 

The papyrus consists of two pages measuring 
respectively: 1st page, 19 inches long by 9i 
inches high; 2nd page, 11 inches long by 9^ 
inches high. 

• Reprinted in Maspero's liibliot/ieque Ji(/i/plolo<fiijuc, 
Tuiue t», Plates IX aud X. 

C 'J, 



( 20 ) 



TRANSCRIPTION. 



Page 1. 



e^l 






I n 



■MM 



^^. 






^r.n: 



3.n© = 



-2al 



h Q' 



.l>r,M 



I I I I III 



f 






w 



4. 1^^ |i? cr-=i n 
""=3. nn /? A Dn'7 



'J 



o fi © 






^ s=* I I I a..«>aX 111 |*B^ 



1 1 1 



w 



I -^^ ^ III 



ujini m^^^ 






(2 



ioe; 



Ci ©I 



7. ©^ 

Ci ® III 






III 



"^mli^llA^^i 






( iil ) 



Tbansliteration. 

I. 

1. neb dnhh uza senb ne se-zefau [/•«</*] 

2. neb ne ta dst net'i tua am sen reth neh ne pa ta kher 
dr Pen-hwj-hdn unu em mer iihu zed nef dmmdttt 
nd ud seshu ne dut nd neruy shefyt 



3. duf dut nef ud seshu ne rd ne ( Rd-user-madt mery- 
Amen )| dnkh uza senb pa neter ad pay/ neb unkh 
uza senb duf kheperu her neter peh syh ne na reth 
duf peh ta ladul [ne] 

4. per kheu tai ket dst adt zat duf kheperu her art reth 
ne menh seshu ne mery dut dzaytii er khen em det 
rudu Ad'i-ra-^nd 

5. her setu ha ta iiat kedei her hekau na ketekhu dza 
nehau ne medeti er khen ant na ketekhu er ben-r'i 
kher dr tutu se-meieruf 



6. her keru du tu gem madt em betau neb ban neb u 
gem hail ef er drtu du madt dmu du dry-ef set er 
zeru d-i-ri-mdu na 

7. ketekhu kheru day but neter neb netert neb ma ked-ef 
du tu art nef na sebayt day ne met a zedu na neteru 
a dr set ref 



Translation. 
I. 

1. The Lord L.P.H. for the provisiouiiiy 

2. All [people] of the place in which I am aud all 
people of the land. Now Penhuiban being 
superintendent of the cattle said to him: "Bring 
me a book which will tell me how to perf'orni 
feats of cunning and strength." 

3. Then he gave to him a book of magical receipts 
from the libraiy (?) of Ra-usev-maat Mory Amen 
(Ramses III) L.P.H. the great god his lord 
L.P.H. Avhereby he could strike blind the people 
aud reach the innennost recesses 

4. of the harem and other secret places. [By cue 
of its receijjfs] he made figures of wax and love 
channs and these he had carried to the interior 
in the hand of an officer named Ad'i-ra-ma. 

5. So that one of the workmen might be removed 
aud the others bewitched aud that thereby 
certain words might be taken to the interior 
chamber and biing others to the outside. Now 
they were examining him about it 

6. it was found to be tnie and all that he had 
done in his heart was abominable and bad. 
The tmth of it was that he made these things 
together with 

7. the other great criminals whom all and every 
god and goddess abominate. They pronounced 
upon him the great judgment of death decreed 
by the gods. 



( 22 ) 



TRANSCRIPTION 



Page 2. 



I nci 



JSM 



i^i^r™^'^! 



J' 



Transliteration. 



. uiif .^em'i nef 



let 



] her pa hetcp 

ef geiien .... /cher at; 

2. \_su iir 7ia hanu a aruf tui tu seineier-ef her her^ ti 
iia tu gem tnailt em bet faic] neb ban neb a (jcm hat'i 
ef er urtu o[w] maCd 

3. [I'lnm uu ary-ef »et er zeru u-'i-ri-mdu na hetekli] u 
kkeru day but neter neb netert neb nid hed-ef uu 
betau day ne met na but day ne 



•t. \_pa ia na d am ef ^ler «r )ta seru dmam em na 
bei<i\u day ne \_met\ d dru ef duf met her zesef kher 
dr na seru net'i her her ef dmam er zed su met zesef 

h. \_d-i-ri-mdu na hetejchu kheru day but jni] Ed md 
kedet ef net'i [»ia] seshu ne neter medu zed d dr su ref. 



Translation. 

1 upon the table .... he came to him .... 

his haiid was paralysed .... Now 

2. [he had done the evil thmg. They examined 
him upon it] and it was found true iu eveiy 
abomination and every evil that their hearts 
desired to do. The truth 

3. [of it was that he did these things in combina- 
tion with the other] great criminals whom all 
gods and all goddesses hate entirely. These 
were the great crimes worthy of death, the 
great abomination of 

4. [the land. They stated that the great crimes 
were worthy of death which he did and he 
killed himself. Now the judges which were 
upon it saw that he killed himself. 

5. With the other great crimiuals hated of Ra 
entirely, the books of the gods say "do thou 
it against [him]."' 



>( 



( 23 ) 



PAPYRUS No. VI. (The .Vjiheest Papykus.) 

(Vide Plates IV-YII.) 

The lower parts of three pages, and fragments 
of one other, of a papyrus containing the con- 
fession of a thief who had robbed the tomb of 
king [Sebek-em-sau-ef] and of his consort Nub- 
Khas ; also the names of other thieves impli- 
cated in the same robbery. It is written in a 
fairly good hieratic hand, but on the last page 
the hieratic becomes exceedingly cursive and 
somewhat resembles that of the verso of the 
Abbott papyrus in the British Museum. The 
trial, of which the documents give an account, 
took place on "the 19th day of the 3rd month 
of the summer season "in the 16th year of a 
king whose name is not recorded. This monarch, 



however, must have been Ramses IX ; it was 
his wazir and officers who tried the case. 

The papyrus has been published in fac-simile 
by Chabas (Melanges Egyptologiques, Troisicme 
Serie, Tome II, plates I-IV, pp. 1-26, together 
with a study of the text by himself and 
Dr. Birch. Prof Erman has also written 
an essay upon it and other documents con- 
nected with the same case, in the Zeitschift 
fiir Aegyptische SjJrache, 1879, pp. 81, 148 ; cf. 
also the same author's Aegypten, pp. 189-198. 

Page 1. (Plate IV.) 

The fragments of the first page apparently 
give a list of names of persons implicated in the 
trial. In the plate the original spacing has 
been adhered to as far as possible. 



TRANSCRIPTION. Page 1 (Plate IV). 

^■■- Q^jjinii i<=iMi^: 

°-[^^W],±^Mm^M^l Hi l^^^l^Kl^^i 

Pki ^1 



m-\% 



m^M^^M^^^^\n^^MU:^nW'i^EM^. 



JTop of page II. 



3 A , 



;] 



Transliteration. 

4 [seteii] neteru .... iir .... neter khert'i 

5. Unu a- \jry\ md\ii] khejyer [a] iry-mdu neter 

kherti 

G. JIdpu sa Ft ah ne ta dst (Ra-user-[mad] mery 
\^Amen'])\ dnlch iiza [senh em per A'\men er khet 
sem per pen kher [u]r renpit XIII. 

7. ...lis pays III ^er . ... II a [«/] art uu d-h-i/ 
mdu hemuu Set-nekht sa Pen^-dnketl 



Translation. 

Of the first five lines only a word here and 
there is preserved. At the end of lino 5 is the 
title of " the necropolis worker," whose name is 
given in 

Line 6. Hapn sou of ... . Ptah of the temple of 
Ramses III L.P.[H. in the house ofJAmen, 

under the authority of the 5fm-priest [ 

of] this house ui the year XIII. 

Line 7 mentions the " labourer '" Set-nekht, son 
of Pen-[anket]. Set-nekht is again mentioned 
on page lY, 1. 4. 



( 24 ) 
TRANSCRIPTION. Page 2 (Plate V). 



en 






MM III 






iAzm-^lll^l%.tTM- 



^ 1 



ciOX Ci ° 



Ill Jfiim \iiiUc^=f=,m ' Mil ©wi**- 









\-Z.^^^^\ 



III U r-^-^ lll, 






o I .a'^o I 111 



■MM 



I II A a; — c "^^ I ,vw^s^^=^ci D 



I I I 



8. 



H<;;]^kfLiirj^i:[«T]i«^m'v^fl^^^^^^k 



1 1 1 



I I o o' 



hS I S Ci 



,L=iI 






I <=. LcJ=i I I I J 1 1 El' -'•^ U I I I 1 Hi/ I fl I 



I I I <=>ll 



r^[!\i^]^ 



1 1 1 



rfl^wii.i^wi4\t,;ii^,;i[o]ik 



III! 

nil' 



( 25 ) 



Tr.V N.-T,T lERATION. 
II. 

1 ne seten hemt (^Nub-khdd-es)\ a.u.s, tay ef 

seten hernt em ta dst 
2. \ne zer]uu Jchefau-set mdk anb .... em kaza Ae[6]« 

tu em Jchesh-khesh du ne sep mdu set em-rd du nu 

gemi set 



3. hetep thdm matet du ne an nayu ddebuy nayu ut unu 
dm sen du ne gem pai 

4. [sa] hu sheps ne pai seten du f henu em khepesh II 
du rekhet d§hert ne mat ne nub er khehhui ef 

b. [iui] pay ef tep nub [Aer] ref du pa sdhu 

sheps ne pai seten dega em nub er zeruu ef ait nay-f 



6. [m<] liu za da em nub hez nub ne khen ne ben-ri em 
adt neb sheps du nu niiy pa nub d 

7. gem nu em pa sdhu sheps ne pat ne,ter hend nay ef 
uzat dper unu er khekhui ef ut unu ef hetep dm sen 

8. [du nu'\ gem seten hemt er mdtet dr'i du nu nuy pau 
gem nu neb dm set em tndtet du nu det khet em nayu 
ut 

y. du nu dza payu gerg per d gem nu d-t-ri-md em 
henu ne nub hez nub dxi nu pekh 

10. kha nu du nu dr pat nub d gem mi em pai neier II 
em nay[u} sdhu uzat dper ut em VIII. 



Translation. 

II. 

1 of the royal wife Nub-khaa-es L.P.H., 

his royal wife iu the place 

2. it was surrounded by masonry, closed \\p with 
stones, protected by rubble, covered with slabs, 
but we penetrated them notwithstanding, and 
covered over with khesh-khesh, and we demolished 
it with work, and we found it 

3. resting likewise. We opened their coffins and 
their wrappings which were in them and we 
found this 

4. noble mummy of this king. It was found ; there 
were two swords and things many of amulets 
and necklaces of gold on his neck, 

5. his head was covered with gold upon it. The 
noble mummy of this king was adorned with 
gold thi'oughout. Its wrappings were graven 
Avith gold and silver within and without and 
covered with every precious stone. We tore ofl" 
the gold that 

7. we found on the noble mummy of this god, 
together with his amulets and necklaces Avhich 
were on his neck and the wrappings on which 
they rested. 

8. We found the royal wife likewise. We tore oflf 
all that Avhich we found from it likewise and we 
set fire to then- 

9. wrappings. We took their furniture which we 
found with them [consisting of], gold and silver 
and copper vases and 

10. We divided and we made this gold which we 
found upon these two gods on their noble 
mummies and the amulets and the necklaces and 
the wrappings into 8 pieces. 



^■S:Mrt^: 






W f]t^^ 



^rnxm. 



( 26 ) 

TRANSCRIPTION. 
Page 3 (Plate VI). 

;^ ™T(l=!3°l^^l111lis 

j^ I -AAA.- y\ h ,UmX|, ^ crrD fl ti^ 



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( -^7 ) 



Translitekation. 

III. 

1. neshedet'i Hdpu sa ne jyer Amen-Rd set en 

neteru er khet pai neter hen tepl ne Amen. 

2. hemtuu A-af-r'i-ne-Ainen ne mer nuy Nes'i-Amen 
neper Amen-Iid seten neteru. 

o. uhui'i Amen-em-heb ne per Amen-dpt net'i sehenu 
em pa ruu ne Amen-dpt er Uiet pai neter hen tep 
ne Amen 

4. uahl Ka-ein-uast ne pa kendii lie per seten (Ka-men- 
kheperu) dnUi uza senb er hhet 

5. ahauu Nefer sa NekhUiu-em-Mat umi em det hen 
nehes'i Thenu-r'i-Amen ne pal neter hen tepl ne Amen. 

6. demd reth unu em pa mer ne pal neter se VIII dr 
semeteru em ken-ken em ha-za-na dine mdna redti 



7. detu zedu em mdlet du mer nut zat Khd-em-uast 
seien redtiul Nesi-Amcn pa sexh ne perui ad dnkh 
uza senb dzatu nau aza er Aatu 



8. er la dmentet nut em renpet XVI dbd III shut heru 
XIX tiah na aza det her pal mer ne pal neter d iiahu 
dsl dm ef 

9. dm pay a semeterl paija sluiua em seshu habi her her 
ref em bah perui ad dnkh uza senb dn zat pa rcduu 
pa iihemu pa hd ne nut. 



Translation. 
III. 

1. The stoue-cuttei' Hapu, sou of of the 

house of Amen-Ka, king of the gods, and under 
the authority of the high priest of Amen. 

2. The labourer A-ar-ri-en-Amen, of the overseer 
of the hvuitsmen, Nesi-Auien, of the house of 
Auieu-Ka, kmg of the gods. 

o. The husbauduum Ainen-em-heb, of the house 
of Amen-apt administratiug iu the district of 
Amen-apt, under the authority of the high priest 
of Amen. 

4. The water-carrier Ka-ein-uast, of the kenau of 
the king Thothmes IV L.P.H., under the autho- 
rity of 

5. The dhail Nefer, sou of Nekhtu-em-Mut, being 
iu the hand of the negro slave Thenu-ri-ameu 
of the high prie.st of Amen. 

6. Total of the persons who Avero iu tlie tomb of 
this god, 8 men : they were examined with 
blows of the stick : they were beateu upon their 
feet 

7. and hands. They said likewise, and were given 
over to the governor of the city and Avazir Kha- 
em-uast, and the royal officer Nesi-amen, the 
scribe of Pharaoh L.P.H. They took the tliieves 
before them 

8. to the west of the city, in the ItJth year the 3rd 
month of the summer season the day 1 5. The 
thieves put their hand upon this tomb of this 
god and [also] upon the asif-chambers in it. 

'.). A record was made of the trial in writiug and 
sent before the Pharaoh L.P.II., by the wazir, 
the lieutenant, the reporter, and the prince of 
the city. 



D 2 



28 ) 



TRANSCRIPTION. 

Page 4 (Plate VII). 

1 ^l/f^llll 






Q © I is 

w a. 



1 1 1 



L=J 



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iti^ 



Transliteration. 

1 se demd rv 

2. dra ?!5 ^ai' mer ne pat neter net'i em task duy em 
her ne pat neter hen tep'i ne Amen-Rd seten neteru 
er de cintu er erdetuu em reth sauu 

3. em pa ska ad ri ne per Amen-Rd seten neteru a-'i- 
ri-mdu nayu uru zaut aarxiu perui da dnhh uza senb 
pay nu neb dnJch uza senb uzdu tayu sebay 

4. hemtuu Set-nehht sa Pen-dnket ne ta hat ( Ra-user- 
mad mery Amen )| dnkh uza senb em per Amen er 
khet neter hen tepi ne Amen-Rd seten neteru sem 
Nesi-Amen ne ta hat ( Rd-user-mad mery Amen )| 
dnkh uza senb em pier Amen. 



Translation. 

1 men : total, 4. 

2. Thieves of this tomb of this god who abscouderl 
and were given over to the high priest of Amen- 
Ra, king of the gods, iu order to summon them 

3. and make them prisoners in the prison of the 
house of Amen, king of the gods, with their 
brother-thieves whose punishment the Pharaoh 
L.P.H., our Lord, shall decide. 

4. The labourer Set-nekht, son of Pen-anket, oi 
the temple of Ramses III L.P.H., in the house 
of Amen and under the authority of the high 
priest of Amen-Ra, the king of the gods the 
sem priest Nesi-amen of the temple of Ramses 
III L.P.H., in the house of Amen. 



( 29 ) 



PAPYRUS No. VII. 
{Vide Plates YIII-XIV.) 

Original tracings of a papyrus formerly be- 
longing to Mr. Harris of Alexandria, and much 
damaged whilst in his possession, the last lines 
of the pages being almost entirely destroyed. 
The tracings were made by Miss Harris about 
the year 1860, when the document was in a 
perfect state, and preserve about forty lines of 
the original. The mutilated papyrus itself was 
found at Medlnet Habu about 1860 and pur- 
chased by the Trustees of the British Museum 
in 18 So : it is now in the National Collection. 
The tracings have been carefully compared 
with the papyrus and the extent of its damage 



can be at once seen on reference to the Plates 
YIII-XIV. 

This once magnificent document is written in 
the large and bold hieratic writing (which is 
sometimes very cursive) of the end of the 
XXth dynasty. It is dated in the 17th year 
of the reign of Ramses IX and refers to a case 
of robbery of gold, silver, and copper stolen 
from tombs in the Theban necropolis. 

In the fifth line of page 1 (PI. VIII) it is 
stated that the case was tried by the wazir 
Kha-em-uast and the high priest of Amen, 
Amen-hetep. The names of over one hundred 
persons of various trades and occupations, 
implicated in the robbery, are given : many of 
them are known also from other papyri {vide 
Introduction, p. 13). 



TRANSCRIPTION. Page 1 (Plate VIU). 



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( 31 ) 



Tr AN SLITKEATION. 
I. 

1. [Henpit] xvn abd I pert hem V kher hen Men baft 
neb taui { Ra-nefer-ka-setep-en-Ra )\ A.U.S. sa Rd 
neb Mail 

2. (Rd-meses khd-em-uast )| A.U.S. mei-y Aineu-Rd 
seten neteru meii/ Amen-Rci seten neteru 

3. de unkh zet ev neheh luu dtef-ef Amen-Ru seten 
neteru Mut uH nebt Asheru 

4. duti zedel ne na nau hemt ne na azay a yeniyt du 
zayu ta ast nefert 

5. a dryu zat Khd-em-uast neter hen tepi ne Amen- lid 
seten neteru Amen-hetepu em per Madl em net 

6. payu semeter d dttyt em thet er shed em del hd Pa- 
ser-ad sesh hesept Un-nefer ad kedetu 



7. Lher-khepesh ne pa kher .... ka-det ne a Khensu- 
mes ne pa kher 

8. na zedet ne azay AmeH-iid-shert Hera ne ]>a kher 

9. dnkh ne 7nit A7i-nu-[re] ta hebsu ne sesh Seny enti 
em, met hesmen kebu ar n deben 35 hesmen d dr 
deben 10. 

10. Khuyuu Khensu-d [?/e] Mer-ur hesmen ad 

dr deben 20. 

11. sesh Bak-en-khensu ne khenu hemt deben 20. 

12. sauu Ankh (?)-Mentu-nekhtu ne per Amen er khet 
pa neter hen tejyi ne Amen, hesment deben 10 

13. hen A-dn-nu-reka ne pa neter hen tepi ne 
Amen. 5 

14. xthduu Neb-nd ne pa neter hen sen ne Amen. 10 

15. sjiyiiu Nes-su-sebek-a ne mer ne Mer-ur 

hesmen kebu hesmen ad dr deben 10 

16. na zedet ne azay Pen-ta-ur sa Amen-nekhiu ne pa 
kher 

17. sesh Ra-mery ne pa neter hen tepi ne Amen hesmen 
kebu or hemtu deben 4. 

\^. her tisekh Auf-ue-Aiiieu ne ta hat er khet jtu 
neter hen teji'i ne Amen, hemt deben 10. 



Tkanslation. 



1. [The year] 17, the first mouth of the spring 
season, the day 5, under the majesty of the king 
of Upper and Lower Eg}-pt, Ra-uefer-ka-setep- 
eu-Ra L.P.H., sou of Ra, lord of the crowns, 

2. Ramses [IX] shining in Thebes L.P.H., beloved 
of Amen-Ra, khig of tiie gods, beloved of Amen- 
Ra, king of the gods (sic). 

3. Giving life eternally for ever Uke his father 
Amen-Ra, king of the gods aud Mnt the gi-eat 
lady of Asher. 

4. List of the names of the metal thieves who were 
found to have robbed the necropolis, and who 
were examined 

5. by the wazir Kha-em-uast and the high priest of 
Amen-Ra king of the gods Amen-hetep in the 
house of Maat in the city (Thebes), 

(). aud (their names) were written down in order 
that they might be arrested by the piincc Pa- 
ser-aa the scribe of the nome, Un-nefer, the 
vhief of the M'orkmeu 

7. User-Khepesli of the necropolis ka-det 

of the doorkeeper Khonsu-mes of the necropolis 

8. The statement of the thief Amen-ua-shert and 
Hora of the necropolis. 

y. The woman Au-uu-re, the seamstress of the 
scribe Seuy who is dead. Bronze vessels maldiig 
35 deben, a making 10 deben. 

10. The merchant Khonsu-a of the Fayum. 

Metal vases making 20 deben. 

11. The scribe Bak-en-khonsu of the cabinet. 
Copper deben 20. 

12. The guardian Aukh-(?; ilenthu-neklitu of the 
house of Ameu under the authority of the high 
priest of Amen. Copper deben 10. 

13. The slave A-au-uu-reka of the liigh priest of 
Amen. 5. 

14. The boat-man Neb-na of the second priest of 
Amen. 10. 

15. The merchant Nes-su-sebeka of Mer .... of 
the Fayum. Copper /.'aiM-vessels copper dd- 
vessels making 10 deben. 

10. The statement of the thief Pen-ta-ur sou ot 

Ameunekht of the necropolis. 
17. The scribe Ra-mery of the high priest of 

Amen. Copper vessels making copper 4 deben. 
IS. The boat-;'Cj«e Auf-eu-Amen of the temple aud 

under the authority of the high priest of Amen. 

Copper 10 debon. 



( 32 ) 



TKANSCRIPTION. 

Page 2 (Plate IX). 



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( 33 ) 



Transliteration. 
II. 

1. heiittuu Pa'i-iieferneper(Neter-duat)\ A.U.S. 

ne Amen 10. 

2. sekheti Khensu-mes ne nefuu ne per Ariieii 10. 

3. sehhet'i Pa-hes'i ne per Amen 10. 

4. sekheti Nef-nezem ne per Amen 10. 

5. sau Sety ne ta shent perui ad A. U.S. 10. 

6. sekheti zay Anien-em-amio ne per /hncn 10. 

7. sami Keny-Amen neper ( Neler-duut )l ^1. U.S. 
Amen 10. 

8 Sen-nefer ne per Sehek neb mer ideru 10. 

9. uhduu Nekht-Amen-uast 5. 
10. udb Sety ne jm kendu ne seten ( Jia-neb-mad )| 

A. U.S. cr khet sem Herd 5. 



11. na zedet ne dzay Nekht-min sa Pen-ta-iir nc 
pa kher 

12. shynu Pa-nekht-em-nut ue Mer-ur 5. 

13. ^kyuu Nes-su-sebek-d ne Mer-sen-dri nc Mer- 
ur nub kedet hemt 20. 

14. hernti Amen-heru-db ne pa kher hemt 3. 

15. debu Pa-dbu-nekht ne ta hat ( Hd-itser-mad 
mery Amen )| A.U.S. er khet pa neter hen lepi 

ne Amen 3. 

16. debu Asherlu-khetu ne ta hut ( Rd-user-mad 
mery Amen)] A.U.S. 2. 

17. reth kedet User-hdt-meru ne pa kher 2. 

18. dnkh ne nut Ta-ry-sepi ne pa kher la hebsu 

ne reth kedet Herd 1. 

ly. dnkh ne nut Ta-ka-urx/ ne pa kher 1. 



Translation. 
II. 

1. The ciaftsiucui Pa'i-nefer, (jf the house of 
divine worship L.P.H., of Amen. 10. 

2. The weaver Khonsu-mes, of the boatmen 

of the temple of Amen. 10. 

3. The weaver Pa-hesi, of the temple of Amen. 10. 

4. The weaver Nefn-nezem, of the temple of 
Amen. ] 0. 

5. The guardian Sety, of the granary of 
Pharaoh L.P.H. 10. 

6. The weaver and sculptor Amen-em-amu, 

of the temple of Amen. ] 0. 

7. The guardian Keny-Amen, of the house of 
divine worship L.P.H., of Amen. 10. 

8. The .... Sen-nefer, of the temple of Sebek, 
lord of Mer-atei-u. 10. 

9. The boatman Nekht-amen-uast. 5. 

10. The uab-priest Sety, of the kenau of the 
king Ra-neb-maa (Amenhetep III) L.P.H. , 
mider the authority of the scwi-priest of 
Hora. 5. 

11. The statement of the thief Min-nekhtsou of 
Pentaur of the necropolis. 

12. The merchant Pa-nekht-em-nut, of the 
Fayum. 5. 

13. The mercha,ut Nes-su-sebeka uf Mer-seu-ari 

of the Fayum, gold 1 kiti, copper 20. 

14. The metal-worker Araen-heru-ab, of tlie 
necropolis, copper 3. 

15. The sandal- maker Pa-abu-nekht, of tlie 
temple of Ra-user-maa-mery Amen (Ramses 
III) L.P.H., under the authority of the high 
priest of Amen. 3. 

16. The sandal-maker Ashertu-khetu, of the 
temple of Ra-\iser-maa-meiy Amen (Ramses 
III) L.P.H. 2. 

17. The workman User-hat-meru, of the necro- 
polis 2. 

18. The woman Ta-ri-sepi, of the necropohs, 
the seamstress of tlic workman Hor-a. 1. 

19. The woman Ta-ka-ary, of the necropolis. 1. 



( 34 ) 



2. pei 



Q I 



TEANSCEIPTION. 

Page 3 (Plate X). 



I 



I r"^^ 



C/ IV, 7 






8. 

9.1 
10. 
11. 

12. ;:: 

13. U 

15. f^ 

16. T" 






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( 35 ) 



Teansliteration. 

III. 

1. shuy Pai-kha-ru em det shyu Pay-seb 

2. shuy Her-mad-det mes ne Ta-thenu-ry 

3. reth hedet Sen-nezem ne pa klier 

4. vah Pend-nehht-svrher-Amen ne pa neler hen 
tepi 7ie Amen 

5. dteklm Ua-nu-re ne sem Herd ne ta hat selen 
{Ea-neh-maa)\ A. U.S. 

6. skyu Payu-nezem ne Mer-ur 

7. pefes-genen Sheny ne per Kliensu 

8. pefes-genen Pa-he-pata ne per Amen 

9. pefes-genen Y-tau-nefer ne per Amen 

10. shy Ashertu-keny ne Mer-ur 

11. sesh neter hat Pa-nehht-resu-tep ne ta hat 
( Rd-user-mad niery Amen)\ A.U.S. 

12. reth kedet Ky-sen ne Amen-nekhtu 

13. kamy An-uuu ne ta hat er khet pa ad ne 
per ne ta hat 

14. pefes-genen Pa-kau-pauda ne pa mer nenu ne 
Amen 

15. dnkh ne nut ne Ta-mdy em det reth kedet 
Nehesi ne pa kher 

16. 7ia zedet ne dzay Amen-hetepu sa Pen-ta-ur 
ne pa Icher 

17. her usekh Auf-ne-Amen ne ta ust {Rd-user-mad 
mery Amen )| A. U.S. er khet pay neter hen tepi 
ne A men 

18. relh kedet Sen-nezem ne pa kher 

19. udb hemiuu Pai-kharu ne ta hat selen {Rd-neb 
mad )\ A.U.S, er khet sem IJerd 



5. 


1 


5. 


2 


5. 


3 




4. 


20. 






5 


6. 




5. 


6. 


5. 


7. 


3. 


8. 


5. 


9. 


5. 


10. 




11. 


5. 




3. 


12. 




13. 


2. 






U. 


8. 






15. 


10. 






10. 




17. 


20. 




4. 


IS. 




19. 


20. 





Translation. 

III. 

. The merchant Pai-kha-ru in the hand of 
the merchant Pay-seba 

. The merchant Hor-maa-det son of Ta- 
thenu-ri 

The workman Sen-nezem of the necropolis 

The water-caiTier Pena-nekth-su-her-Amen 
of the high priest of Amen 

The baker Ua-nu-ri of the sem-priest Hora 
of the temple of the king Ra-neb-maa 
(Amenhetep III) L.P.H. 

The merchant Payu-nezem of the Fayum 

The oil-boiler Sheny of the temple of 
Khonsu 

The oil-boiler Pa-be-pasa of the temple of 
Amen 

The oil-boiler Y-tau-uefer ot the temple of 
Amen 

The merchant Ashertu-keny of the Fayum 

The scribe of the temple Pa-nekht-resu-tep 
of the temple uf Ra-user-maa mery Amen 
(Ramses III) L.P.H. 

The workman Ky-sen of Amen-uckhtu 

The gardener An-uau of the temple and 
imder the authority of the major domo of 
the temple 

The oil-boiler Pa-kau-pauaa of the Super- 
intendent of the huntsmen of Ameu 
The woman Ta-may in the hand of the 
workman Nehesi of the necropolis 

The statement of the thief Amenhetep u 
son of Peutaur of the necropolis 

The hoa,i-7-eise Auf-en-Amen of the temjjle 
of Ra-user-maa-mery-Amen L.P.H., under 
the authority of the high priest of Amen 
The workman Sen-iaezem of the necropolis 
The uai-priest and metal worker Pai-kha-ru 
of the temple of the king Ra-neb-ma (Ameu 
heten III) L.P.H., imder the authority of 
the st'Hi-pnost Hora 



20. 



10. 



20. 
4. 



20. 



( 36 ) 



1(3 ^ 



I C3CZ 



TRANSCRIPTION. 

Page 4 (Plate XI). 



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8. 






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( 37 ) 



Tbansliteration. 
IV. 

1. sesh Pa-seru lie pa per ])erui-ad A.U.S. 5. 

2. khentuu Iler-mes ne ta hat ( Rd-user-mad 
me.ry Ameny\ A. U.S. 5. 

3. sesh Shed-su-khensu ne ia merci ne per Amen 

er khet pa neter hen tep'i ne A men 1 0. 

4. .ihiiii Bak-ur-nu-re ne per Khnemu nch abu 10. 



5. shuy Nes-su-sebekd ne Herd ines [?;«] Thhj j 5. 
hemt deben 30 nub hedet t'. 

6. sel'heU Pen-un-heb ne per Amen er hhet pa 6. 
7ieter hen tep'i ne A men 10. 

7. iiah Pend-nekth-su-her-Amen ne pa neter hen 7. 
tep'i ne Amen 5. 

8. sail Ad-shefy-nehhtu ne ta shent [ne] per 8. 
Amen 5. 

9. na zedet ne uzay Mes sa Pen-ta-ur ne pa kher 9. 

10. lien Meh-ef -pa-neb and ne s/niyt hems ef pa 10. 
kendu ne Amen 10. 

11. sAuy Na-dega [_ne\ dteru ne Mer-ur neb hedel • 11. 
hemt 

12. dnkh ne nut ne Ta-mdy ne nut 

13. dr Ru-re-t'i \iie\per Amen nekhen-ef pa-slut'i- 
re ad per ne per Amen hesnient 

14. uhemuu .... meh sep hemt 

15. her merd Ary-pa-ru-ti ne per Amen 

IQ. padkhiianeper (neter-duat) A.U.S.ne Amen 16. 

em det reth kedet Pa-unshu 10. ; 

17. sekheti Pa-zaza ne per Amen er khet pa neter 17, 
hen tep'i ne Amen 4. \ 

18. sedemuu Md-ha'iru-bdru ne per { neter-diiat) IS. 
A. U.S. ne Amen 10. 

19. sekheti Pa-hes'iu ne per Amen er khet pa neter 19 
hen iepi ne Amen 10. 

20. dnkh ne nut Ta-nepy ne la hebsu ne Pa-ne/er- 20 
sepi ne per ( neter-duat )\ ne Amen 10. ; 



10. 
10. 


12. 




l:j 


6. 




2. 


14 


10. 


15. 



Tbanslation. 

IV. 

The sciibe Pa-seru of the house of 
Pharaoh L.P.H. 5. 

The baker Hor-raes of the temple of 
Ra - user - maa-meiy-Amen (Ramses III) 
L.P.H. 5. 

The scribe Shed-su-khonsu of the canal 
workers of the house of i\men aud imder 
the authority of the high priest of Amen 10. 
The merchant Bak-ur-nu-ri of the temple 
of Khnem Lord of Elephantine 10. 

The merchant Nes-su-sebeka of Hora born 
of Thiy. Copper 30 deben, gold 1 kiti. 
The weaA'er Pen-un-heb of the house of 
Amen under the authority of the high priest 
of Amen 10. 

The water carrier Pena-nekht-su-her-amen 
of the high priest of Amen 5. 

The guardian Aa-shefy-neklitu of the 
gi-anaries of the house of Amen 5. 

The statement of the thief Mes sou of Pen- 
tarn* of the necropolis. 
The slave Jiieh-ef-pa-ueb au-au of the mer- 
chant sitting in the kenau of the house of 
Amen 10. 

Tlie merchant Na-dega of Ateru in the 
Fayum. Gold 1 kiti copper 10. 

The woman Ta-may of the city 10. 

The storehouse [keeper] Ru-ri-ti of tlie 

house of Amen, and (?) Pa-shairi 

major domo of the house of Amen. Copper 6. 
The reporter ..(?)... Copper 10. 

The chief of the canal workers Ary-pa-ru-ti 
of the house of Amen 10. 

The baker of the house of divine worship 
L.P.H., of Amen in the hand of the workman 
Pa-unshu 10. 

The weaver Pazaza of the liouse of Amen 
imder the authority of the high priest of 
Amen 4. 

The hearer (? judge) Ma-hairu-baru of the 
house of divine worship L.P.H.. of Amun 10. 
The weaver Pahcsiu of the house of 
Amen iinder tlie authority of the high priest 
of Amen 10. 

The woman Ta-nepy of the seamstress of 
Pa-nefer-sejji of the house of divine 
worship of Amen 10. 



( -38 ) 



TEANSCRIPTION, 
Page 5 (Plate XII). 









i r^ 



5& I A ' D 
Cf. II, 12. 



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( 39 ) 



Tr AN SLITERATION. 

V. 

1. uab Pu-t^er ne User-hat ne per Amen er khet 

pa neter hen tep'i ne Amen 10. 

2. shi/u Pa-ser-em-nut ne Mer-ur 5. 

3. her merd Saui-pa-demd iie kemdy ne Amen 
An-nu-re 5. 

4. na zedel ne azay Pai-sen sa Ainen-uu-shertu ne 
pa Iher. 

5. shyu Pa-neb-nd ne Mer-ur . hemt 30. 

6. dnkh ne nut Ta-ti-ti-da ta hebsu ne dzay 
Mes sa Pen-ta-ur hemt henu ar ne 10 ta ga 
kher'i hez nub. 

7. net'i em det sekhetl Keny sauu Pa hemt ne pa 
kaht 10. 

8. reth kedet pia-ra-hctepu ne pa kher 10. 

9. hen Ta-ka-zen ne per Amen er khet pa neter 
hen tep'i ne Amen 10. 

10. ilnkh ne nut Ta-senti ta hebsu neiizay Pai-shenz 
hesmen meh beku iir deben 8. 



11. uduu Bak-ur-nu-re ne ta auyt keshi 



10. 



12. her usekh Menthu-dmen ne ta hat ( Rd-user-nuui 
mery- Amen )\ A. U.S. er khet pai neter hen tep'i 

ne Amen . hez nuh deben 1. 

13. shy Set-nekhtu em det dnkh ne nut Unu-em- 
de-d-mut 5. 

14. hesmen d iu pa uzau su em ta gat neti kher hez 
nub 1. 

15. dnkh ne nut Ta-mdy ta hebsu jie ud rekhti ne 

pa neter hen tep'i ne Amen 10. 

16. debit Pa-abu ne ta hat ( Rd-user-mud mery- 
dmen )\A. U.S. er khet pa neter hen tep'i ne Amen 5. 

17. na zedet ne azay Hera sa Ainen-ud-shert ne 
pa kher. 



Translation. 
V. 

1. The «a6-priest Pa-ser uf User-hat of the 
house of Ameu aud uudev the authority of 
the high priest of Ameu 10. 

2. The merchant Pa-ser-em-nut of the Fayum 5. 

3. The cliief of the canal workers Sauii-pa- 
dema of the musician of Amen An-nu-ri 5. 

4. The statement of the thief Pai-sen son of 
Amen-ua-shertu of the necropolis. 

5. The merchant Pa-neb-na of the Fayum. 
Copper 30. 

6. The woman Ta-ti-ti-aa the clothes of the 
thief Mes son of Pentaur. Copper vases 
making 10 silver. 

7. He who is in the hand of the weaver Keny 
and the guardian Pa. Copper of the kah- 
vase. 1. 10. 

8. The workman Pa-ra-hetepu of the necropolis. 10. 

9. The slave Ta-ka-zen of the house of Amen 
under the authority of the high priest of 
Amen 10. 

10. The woman Ta-senti the seamstress of the 
thief Pai - shenz. Bronze. A baku - vase 
making 8 deben. 

11. The lieutenant Bak-ur-nu-ri of the soldiers 

of Ethiopia 10. 

12. The ho&i-reise Mentu-ameu of the temple 
of Ra-user-maa-merj-'Amen (Ramses III) 
L.P.H., under the authority of the high 
priest of Amen. Silver 1 deben. 

13. The merchant Set-nekht in the hand 

of the woman Un-em-det-a-mut 5. 

14. Bronze out of the storehouse and of the 
A'ai-house which is in Silver. 1. 

15. The woman Ta-may, the seamstress of a 
washerman of the high priest of Ameu 10. 

16. The sandal-maker Pa-abu of the temple 
of Ra-user-maa-mery Amen (Ramses III) 
L.P.H., under the authority of the high 
priest of Amen 5. 

1 7. The word of the thief Hora sou of Amen- 
ua-sbert of the necropolis. 



( 40 ) 



TEANSCRIPTIOiV, 



iS !\t^^ 



Page 6 (Plate XITE). 






— ^liJir:^© 



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( 41 ) 



Transliteration. , I 

VI. ' 

' I 

1. uah Ahatiu ne geten sesh erpdti Huy \ 1. 

2. re.khti Nefu ne per Amen er khet pa netcr lun iep i 2. 
ne Amen 

3. dnkh ne nut Ta-henut-pa-nefu ne dmentet o. 

4. duMi ne nut Theni-pa-dbu-pau hemn-es em ta ' 4. 
shentui [«e] per khcnsu 

."). iiah Pen-ta-hat-nekhtu ne seten sesh erpdf'i Hun J. 

6. dnkh ne nut Ta-mdy ne ta hehsu pa neter hen IV <.">. 
ne Amen 

7. reUit'i Khensu-khdu sa ne sexh, Amen-em-per-mul, 7. 
pa neter hen tepi ne Amen 

8. sehhcli liu-ti-tha ne per Amen er khet pa neter hen 8. 
tep ne Amen 

9. hen Ta-shasu jie per Amen er khet pa neter hen 9. 
tep ne Amen 

10. her merd Pen-un-heb ne sesh Pa-dru-sekher ne per 10. 
A men 

11. xiab Ahatiu-ad ne per ne Menlu neb Ant 11. 

12. na zedet ne dzay Pa-hen sa Amen-na-sjuirtu uc pa I'-i. 
kher 

13. reth kedet Pa'i-nefer ne pal neter hen ne pa kher 1 i). 

14. reth kedet Pat-sen ne pa neter hen pa kher 11. 

15. uab Khunsu-etnheb ne tadst seten per {(.id-ka-kheper)\ ' 15. 
A. U.S. 

IG. sesh Pen-ta-ur sa Herd tie ta hat er khet pa ad per IG. 

17. sekheii Pa-sa-puuij (?) neper Amen erkhetpa neter 17. 
hen Icp ne ^Inten 



Translation. 
VI. 

The water carriev Aliatiu of the royal sciibe, the 
hereditary prince Huy 

The washei-man Nefu of the house of Amen 
imder the authority of the high priest of Amen. 

The woman Ta-henut-pa-uefu of the western 
city 

The woman Thout-pa-abu-pau residing in the 
granaries of the temple of Khensu 

The water-carrier Peu-ta-liatuu of the royal 
scribe, the hereditary prince Huy 

The woman Ta-maa <if the seamstress of the 
fourth priest of Amtn 

The washerman Khensu-khau sou of the scribe 
Amen-eii-per-mut of the lugh priest of Amen 

The weaver Ru-ti-tha of the house of Amen 
and under the autliority of the high priest of 
Amen 

The female slave Ta-shasu of the house of 
Amen and under the autliority of the high priest 
of Amen 

The chief of the canal workers, Pen-mi-heb 
of the scribe Pa-aru-sekher of the house of 
Amen 

The (t((/;-priest Ahatiu-aa of the temj^le of Aleutu 
lord of Erraeut. 

The statement of the thief Pa-ken son of Amen- 
ua-shertu of the necropolis 

The workman Pai-nefer of tin- high priest of the 
necropolis 

The worlcman Pai-seu of the priest of the 
necropolis 

The uab-priestKhensu-em-heb of the domaiu(?)of 
the kmg [lla]-aa-kheper-Ka (Thothmes II) L.P.II. 

The scribe Pen-ta-ur son of Hora of the temple 
and under the authority of ihe major domo 

The weaver Pa-sa-puuy of the house of Amen 
and under the authority of the high priest 
of Ameu 



( 42 ) 



£13 w 






TEANSCEIPTION. 

Page 7 (Plate XIV). 






cm 



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12. 






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( 43 ) 



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III I 



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III I 



£^ I C>l 



Transliteration. 
VII. 

1. sekhet'i Keiiy sauu herns-ef em nut 



10 



2. relh kedet A zeda-nezem ne Pu'i-ka-rl-sepi ne pa 
kher 4. 

3. nefuu A^eg-su-Amen ne pa neter hen [?te] 



Anher 

4. hen Kha-tha ne 7a-ka-ri w, per Amen 

5. uduu Bak-ur-nu-ri ne ta aityt kesh'i 

6. udl) Zed-tu-em-sha-nehan du-sa-ri-t'i [«<'] per 
Mut 

7. sauu Pa-nefer-em-neb ne ta shcnta \_ne] j)er 
Amen 

8. dnkhne nut Mutil) Amenta hehsu ne hemi'l 
Amen-rekliu ne ast Maut 

9. sauu IJeterd (/) ne ta shent ne per Amen er 
khet pa vier shentiui 

10. mer sutiu Pa-ha tu-ti {^) ue per Amen 

11. khdku Kij-ne ban du 

12. theh-theh Ky-ne ban au ne hems-ef pa kend 
(Bd-men-pehtt) A. U.S. 

13. pa dzay Herd sa Amen-ud-shert ne pa-kher 



4. 
10. 

u;. 

10. 
10. 
10. 
10. 

4. 

4. 



14. sekhtl Pa-ha ! .... nekhiu ! hems ef em per ne 
perui ad A. U.S. Ta-ru-du ne kheni meht .... 
hemt Ir 

1.1. hemtuu Pa-scp'iy-her-hdt ne pa kher hesmen 



1(5. nefuu Pa-mdy (f) hems-ef em apt em ta at [ne] 
. ... pa neter hen tep'i ne A men 

17. vekhtl Kha-ruy ne pa neter hen ne Mentu neb 
Anu er khet pa neter hen ne Mentu 

18. sAyjt Ka-za-day hems ef pa-usekh ne shuu 
Nes-su-sebekd 

ghuu Her-shefij-khdu 

VIII. 

1. shuyuu An-nu-ri-day ne Mer-ur 

2. dnkh ne nut An-nu-ry ne Ameniet 



4. 



10. 
10. 



mil 

mil 



Translation. 
VII. 



1. The weaver Keny and tlie guardian resid- 
ing in the city. 10. 

2. The workman Azedu-nezem of Pai-ka-ri- 
sepi of the necropolis 4. 

11 The boatman Nesi-sii-Ameu of the priest 
of Anher 4. 

4. The female slave Kha-tha of Ta-ka-ri of 
the house of Amen 10. 

5. The lieutenant Bak-ur-nu-ri of the Ethiopian 
soldiers 10. 

6. The Ma6-priest Zed-tu-em-sha-neban au-sa- 
ri-ti of the temple of Mut 16. 

7. The guardian Pa-nefer-em-neb of the 
granary of the temple of Amen 10. 

8. The woman Amen, the seamstress of the 
craftsman Amen-rekhu of the Place of Maat 10. 

y. The guardian Hetera(?) of tlie granary of 
the temple of Am6n under the authority of 
the overseer of the gi'anaries 10. 

10. The Superintendent of the doctors Pa- 
hatu-ti (?) of the house of Amen 10. 

11. The barber Ky-ue ban au 4. 

12. (?).... Ky-ue ban au residing in (?) the 
kena of Ea-men-pehti (Ramses I) L.P.H. 4. 

13. the thief flora son of Amen-ua-shert of the 
necropolis 

14. The weaver Pa-ha .... nekhtu re- 
siding in (?) the house of Pharaoh L.P.H. , 
tlie of the interior of the north, copper 1.'). 

6. 15. The metal worker Pa-sepiy-her-hat of tlie 

necropolis bronze (>. 

16. The boatman Pa -may residing in the 
division of the department of the high priest 
of Amen 4. 

17. The washerman Kha-ruy of the priest of 
Jlontu lord of Erment and under the au- 
thority of the priest of Mentu 4. 

18. 'J'he merchant Ka-za-aay residing in tiic 
boat (?) of the merchant Nes-su-sebeka 10. 
The merchant Her-shefy-khau 10. 

VIII. 

i 
5. I 1. The merchant An-nu-re-aay of the Fayum 5. 

0, 2. The woman An-nu-re of the western city 5. 

F 2 



( 44 ) 



C. GEOGRAPHICAL PAPYRUS. 



PAPYRUS No. VIM. 



(PLATES XV-XVIII.) 

Fragments of a papyrus about 5 feet in 
length by 10 j inches high relating to the 
geography of Egypt and the Fayum. It is 
written in small and clear hieroglyphic hand- 
writing, and perhaps originally formed part of 
a second roll of the Great Fayum Geographical 
treatise, portions of which are preserved in 
the Gizeh Museum and among the private 
collection of Mr. Hood, of Nettleham Hall, in 
Lincolnshire. 

It is impossible, however, to fit the Amherst 
fragments on to the pieces now known, but 
the papyrus itself relates to the same subject 
and is written in the same handwriting as the 
Gizeh and Hood documents. 

On a small strip at Nettleham Hall, recently 
published by Lanzoni, occurs the cartouche 
of one of the Ptolemies (? Euergetes II), thus 
dating the document to Ptolemaic times. 

The first half of the papyrus (Pis. XV-XVI) 
is divided into eight vertical columns, each being 
subdivided horizontally into five compartments 
containing figures of the crocodile-god Sebek. 
To the right of each figure is written the name of 
the god and of the nome or locality over which 
he was supposed to preside. In several cases 
the place-names have been destroyed : in the 
following list of the nomes of Upper Egypt I 
have, for completeness sake, inserted between 
brackets these destroyed names. 



PLATE XV.— THE NOMES OF 
LOWER EGYPT. 

Column I. 

[No. 1. ^3 Ta-Khent, Nubia.] 

" ^' li^^© Thes-Heru, the Apollinopo- 
lite Nome, 



^^ I 



„ 4. 



Ten, the Latopolite Nome. 

.■^ Mert-ra, the Theban Nome. 
3Q I© ' 

,, 5. Mt.^ >.^ iZijrui, the Coptite Nome. 



Column II. 



i-^ii 



[ „ 6. ^ A-du, the Tentyrite Nome.] 



" ^- ' T © 'S^i^^^' t'ti6 Diospolite Nome. 

m a 
„ 8. Y\© ^^^^j the Thinite Nome, 

[ » ^- s^" Min, the Panopolite Nome.] 

,, 10. v-^jrf^ Uazt, the Aphroditopolite 
Nome. 



( 45 ) 



Column III. 

No. 11. [^ Set^, the Hypselite Nome. It is 
interesting to note that the name of 
Set is not inserted in the pajjyrus, 
doubtless owing to the religious scruples 
of the ancient scribe. 

» 12. ^^Q Du-ef, the Antaeopolite Nome. 
„ 13. "^fffh© Atef-Khent, the Lykopolite 
Nome. 

„ 14. =^_^® Atef peh, the Northern 

Lykopolite Nome, of which Custe was 
the capital. 

„ 15. ^^"1 Unt, the Hermopolite Nome. 



Column IY. 

[ „ 16. ^it Mahez, the Northern HermoiDO- 
lite Nome, the Oryx Nome of earlier 
times.] 

[ ,- 17. v-^\« ^nwy?, the Cynopolite Nome.] 

[ ,, 18. -^d Sep, the Eastern Oxyrrhyuchite 
Nome.] 
,, 19. i\\'^ Het-seten, the metropolis (?) of 

1 J 1 Uaseh, the Western Oxyrrhyu- 
chite Nome. 
„ 20. I 2)"^'^ Henen-Seten, Heracleopolis, 
the capital of inlll Am-Khent, the 
Heracleopolite Nome. 

PLATE XVI.— THE FAYUM AND NOMES 
OF LOWER EGYPT. 

Column I. 

The 6rst place-name is destroyed : it should 
probably be restored ^-^ ^a^ Ta-she, the Nomos 



Arsinoites, or El Fayum. In the second com- 
partment occurs the name of '^^^'^ Shedet. 
Crocodilopolis, the capital of the Faydm. With 
the third compartment begins the Hst of the 
Nomes of Lower Egypt which are not all ar- 
ranged geographically, nor in accordance with 
other Nome lists of Ptolemaic times. The 
following numbers therefore refer to the com- 
partments of the respective columns, and not to 
the number of the Nomes. 

No. 3. li I ^ Anbu-hez, the Memphite or first 

Nome of Lower Egypt. 
,, 4. ® ^ Seithamt, Letopolis, the chief 

town of the Letopolite or second Nome, 
" ^' "^© Avicnt, the Libyan or third Nome. 



Column II. 

1. ;Oi^ Sapi, comprising the two Saite 
Nomes, the fourth and fifth of Lower 

Egypt. 

2. I T^ Ri-ncfer, the or^ouf^is of the 
Greek Geographers {cf. Bkugsch, Diet. 
Geog., p. 1017). 

3. ^» '^ Bah, the metropolis of the 

fifteenth Nome, i.e., the Hermopolite 
Nome of the Delta. 

4. v-^i-'^ Ham-hit, the Mendesius Nome, 
the sixteenth Nome of Lower Egypt. 

5. I ^^A ^ Theh-neter, Sebennytos, the 
metropolis of the twelfth or Sebennytes 
Nome. 



Column III. 
„ 1 and 2. The place-names are destro^'ed. 

metropolis of the seventh or Metelite 
Nome. 



( 46 ) 



No. 4. ^K^ "^^^^^ Zar, Tanis, the capital of the 
fourteenth or Tanite Nome. 
,, 5. 1 X "^ Heq-dt, the thirteenth or Heho- 
pohte Nome. 

Column IV. 

,, 1. l^^^" 8am-hud, the seventeenth or 
Diospolite Nome. 

" ^-QnPS-] Het-lUartl Ay^vi^n 

„ 3. -O*^ -fe>' Bast, Bubastes, the capital 
of the eighteenth of Bubastite Nome. 

„ -4. ^?= Amt, Buto, the capital of the nine- 
teenth or Buticus Nome. 

,, 5. ,==^^ Ta-remt, i.e., "the laud of fish," 
probably the lake region around Men- 
zaleh. 

PLATE XVII. 

The left-hand fragment on PI. XVII joins on 
to the right-hand fragment on PI. XVI, and 

refers to ^\^^ sebek shedet, the god of 
the Faytlm. 

The right-hand fragment of PI. XVII con- 
tains three complete and the halves of two 
other vertical columns of hieroglyphics. The 



inscription names the goddess Isis in connection 
with the myth of Sebek, and that god's connec- 
tion with '"" Ta-she, the Faydm. 



PLATE XVIIL 

To the left is a mutilated picture of the 

I J ^iLfn'^ hat oieter net ^ent Neith, 

" Temple of the acacia of the goddess Neith." 
An archer drawing a bow with arrow is repre- 
sented in the shrine, behind which is depicted 
an acacia tree ; the whole scene is surrounded 
by a canal or moat. 

In the centre of the page is a mythical descrip- 
tion of the region called Shent-Neith, beginning: 

S^ \\\ ^ %. ^^'^^ ^^^ shend Neith ^m ren 
cf iiu ges neter aat na Sehck neh Ri-seh, " This 
locality bears the name Shend-Neith {i.e., the 
acacia of the goddess Neith). It is at the side 
of the temple of Sebek, Lord of Ei-seh." 

To the right is represented a canal in the 
form of + and eight mythical personages, 
those to the left being 3 kek and his 

consort ^^j| keket and \\M heh and 
X Rojj hehet, -whilst those to the right are 
3 NUT and ^ J NUT (the female) and 

[(|^J? AMEN and (j^^^J AMENT 



4 



( 47 ) 



D. MYTHICAL PAPYEUS. 



PAPYRUS No. IX. (The AsTAETE Paptrcs.) 



X 



(PLATES XIX-XXI.) 



Fragments of two pages and the lower part 
of three others, of a papyrus mentioning the 
goddess Astarte, written in a very clear and 
neat hieratic hand of the XlXth or XXth 
dynasty. How and when it came into the 
possession of Lord Amherst is not known, 



but it was already in his collection in 1871, 
when Dr. Samuel Birch published a short ac- 
count of it in the Zeitschrift fur Aegyptische 
Sprache (pp. 119, 120). The subject appears to 
be certain " tribute of the sea " which was paid 
to the Phcenician goddess Astarte by (?) a 
messenger of Ptah, but the papyrus is unfortu- 
nately too fragmentary to permit of any con- 
nected translation being made. 



( 48 



E. ACCOUNTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAPYEL 



^ 



PAPYRUS No. X. 



FRAGMENTS of a papyrus -written in the hieratic 
'writing of the Middle Kingdom, apparently 
containing some accounts relating to flax, 
domestic animals, etc. It is probable that 
these fragments once belonged to the great 
account papyrus of Gizeh (Boidac Papyri, "So. 
18), but unfortunately they cannot now be 
fitted into their original places. On the 
smallest fragment occurs the name of -=35=^ 1 ^^ 
SEBEK-HETEP. On the SBCond we read : — 



=^^| Ar-l^de-']ek nef, " If thou givest 
him 

^^'^M /«e/^,flax 

(j ^-0 V g «/• - [c/e -] ek vet; If thou 

givest him 

^& ^ A '^, ['^^Jil- — ^^ ^"^ "-'"' taken out 
of the magazine 

■ft-^, I j5^|^-S medetu aut, stall oxen 

ItH BH °| I ..-O n '^'' ,0 1| shashii heq 15, 13 heq 
of beads 

-JL 1^ '^^^l I'^M dm veil ef ne zazat, name 
list of the auditors 

M ^ (I ]| ^\\\M sesh ne zazat, the scribe of 
the auditors " 

Fragment I, height 5 inches,length 2f inches. 
Fragment II, height 2 inches, length | inch, j 



PAPYRUS No. XI. 
(PLATE XXI. Nos. IV and V.) 

Two fragments of an hieratic papyrus men- 
tioning a building of Horemheb (the last king 
of the XVIIIth dynasty) in the temple of 
Amen. A similar building of Seti-mer-en- 
Ptah (Seti I), the second ruler of the XlXth 
dynasty, is mentioned in the first fragment in 
the right hand top corner. These two frag- 
ments evidently belong to the series of accounts 
of the time of Seti I, preserved in the Museum 
of the Louvre and published by Spiegelberg in 
his Reclirmngen aus der Zeit Seti I, but tliey 
do not fit exactly with any of the fragments in 
Paris. 

PLATE XXI. No. IV. 

1- El^^L^i^fiP ^Voryt\ perid aa 



o I 

I 

nm I n n 

A.U.S. 



CTJ!] ti^ 



ges per- (Heru-em-heh)\ em 2^sr Amen 
w *^ 



meh XL 






meh XXXV 



5. [e3]^c^|^- 



DO^ n 



e ^ 



L^l ash 



shemshemu her Khetemu 



1. Estates (?) of the Pharaoh L.P.H. 

2. [near (?)] the house of Hor-em-heb iu the 

temple of Amen 



( 49 



3. Great beam of cypress of 40 cubits 

4. Beam of cypress of 35 cubits 

5. Shemshemu of cypress on the seal ? 



> 



PAPYRUS No. XII 



Fkagment of a papyrus in a very curious 
hieratic character of about the XlXth dynasty, 
of uncertain character and much mutilated. 
Length 5|- inches by 4| inches high. 



) 



PAPYRUS No. XIII. 





PLATE XXL No 


. V. 

Ptah. 

^^ 
the 


. . of the 

^... the 
temple of 


Hi?- 
^S6 


house of Seti-mery [ne] 

house of Hor-em-heb in 
Amen." 







Fragment of an hieratic papyrus apparently 
of about the same date as No. XII. Of uu- 
certain character. Much mutilated. 
Length 6 inches by 4^ inches high. 



y 



PAPYRUS No. XIV. 



Fragment of a papyrus written in the hieratic 
character, apparently of about the XlXth 
dynasty. The contents were perhaps of a 
literary character, but it is too mutilated to 
read or transcribe. 

Length 11|^ inches by 3^ inches wide. 



^ 



PAPYRUS No. XV. 



Fragment of a very mutilated papyrus, written 
in the hieratic character of the XlXth 
dynasty, containing fragments of a literary 
text of uncertain origin. Too much mutilated 
to decipher or transcribe. 

Length 12^ inches by 6 inches high. 



( 50 ) 



F. EELIGIOUS PAPYRI: BOOKS OF THE DEAD. 



(a.) HIEROGLYPHIC. 



7< 



PAPYRUS No. XVI. 



/ 



PAPYRUS No. XVII. 

(PLATE XXII.) 



Papyrus of the 



Papyrus of the ^ ^ ^o-' Sauti per-hez, 
" guard of the treasurj^'"' 1 1 ^ Nefer-renpet, 
"Nefer-renpit." It contains parts of Chapters 1, 
42, 54, 57, 58, Gl, 63, 67, 75, 99, 105, 125, 
127, 137, 144 a-g, 145 a, f, m, n, 149, li, i, o, 
and 152. It is written in large hieroglyphic 
writing and is illustrated by numerous well 
executed, but for the most part mutilated 
vignettes. 

Period. XlXth Dynasty. [Seven sheets.] 



her sauti 



seshu ne neh taui, " Chief of the guardians 
(= Chief Librarian) of the writings of the lord 
of the two lands {i.e., the king)," named 

j 110^ dOay, " Khay." It contains parts 
of Chapters 1, 17, 91-93, 105, 110 a, 121, 124, 
125, 136, 137, 144 and 145. The writing is 
large and bold and the paf)yrus contains some 
coloured vignettes. Another part of this 
papyrus is preserved in the British Museum 
(No. 9935 Lebri). 

Pei-iod. XlXth Dynasty. Three sheets : tlie 
width of the papyrus being about 14|- inches. 



~^ PAPYRUS No. XVIII. 

Papyrus of the J^^ ^2 mer shentui ne neb 
ioMi, "Superintendent of the granaries of the 



Lord of the two lands" f ffl '^ Ptah-mes 
"Ptahmes." It contains parts of Chapters 48, 
51, 76, 82, 87 and 141, and upon the verso of 
the first fragment a line of large hieroglyphs 
(1^ inches in height) giving the name and titles 
of its original owner. It is unfortunately in a 
very mutilated condition. 

Period. Late XVIIIth or early XlXth 
Dynasty. Two sheets. Width 2 feet 3 inches. 



7< 



PAPYRUS No. XIX. 



juxmj 



Papyrus of the ^ ./^^n jv qema 
Amen, "Musician of Amen," r^^fllj^ Nuhy, 
" Nuby," containing part of Chapter 146 of the 
Book of the Dead, written in the large hiero- 
glyphic writing of the XlXth Dynasty. The 
name has been inserted by a different hand to 
the rest of the document. 1 page. Width 
16 inches. 



% 



PAPYRUS No. XX. 



Papyrus of 



I ^ Rd-nefer, "Ra-nefer," 
containing parts of Chapter 149 {h, d, g, I, m, 
n, o) of the Book of the Dead. The writing is 
hieroglyphic, but the script is smaller than that 
in the four preceding documents. The name 
T W^, Ra-nefer has been roughly inserted 

in a different handwriting to the rest of the 
manuscript. 

Period. XlXth or early XXth Dynasty. 
V/idth 13 inches. 



( 51 ) 



PAPYRUS No. XXI. 



PAPYRUS No. XXIV. 



Papyrus of the 
Ra seten netcru. 



I III hen neter Amen 
" Priest of Amen E.a, king 
of the gods " ] i S3 Wi, Nesl-dmen, " Nesi- 
Amen," containing the vignette of Chapter 125 
of the Book of Dead. XXIInd Dynasty. 
1 page. Width 7 inches. 



Papyrus of 



Heru-se-dst, " Hor- 



^ 



-/ 



PAPYRUS No. XXII. 

(PLATE XXIII.) 



se-Isis," containing fragments of Chaptera 15 
and 18 of the Book of the Dead, written in 
large and well-formed hieroglyphics. The 
original height and length of this document 
cannot be ascertained, as only some thirty 
fragments of the lower part of the scroU are 
preserved. XXVIth Dynasty or later. 



Papyrus of . „'^ 
heru," born of the 



>n 



, Pede-heru, " Pede- 
^[1^|, neht per 



Du-nes-nes, " Lady of the house, Durnesnes.'' It 
contains parts of Chapters 11-13, 37, 38, 41, 79, 
91-94, 108, 109, 145/-A, ^-/, and the vignette 
of Chapter 165 of the Book of the Dead. The 
writing is hieroglyphic and very small, but 
beautifully executed, and the vignettes are of 
considerable merit. XXVIth Dynasty. Width 
8# inches. 8 sheets. 



PAPYRUS No. XXIIl. 

Papyrus of the ny|*^^lni, ^en neto' ne 
Amen Ra seten neierii, " Priest of Amen-Ea, 
king of the gods" '^-A^^'^^' Ym-hctep, 
" Im-hetep," son of "Tif , Aah-mes, " Aahmes," 

also a priest of Amen-Ra, by the ri^^n 
neht per dhij ne Amen-Ra, " Lady of the house 
and chantress of Amen-Ra, '^^^ ^'=^^^'=w, 
Ta-lihred-dh,, "Ta-khred-ah." It contains Chap- 
ters 15 (a and h) and 89, with rough vignettes. 
The writing is hieroglyphic, but small, and of an 
inferior hand. XXVIth Dynasty. Width 
14 inches. 



X 



PAPYRUS No. XXV. 



Papyrus, with a blank space left for the 
name of the purchaser to be inserted, written 
in the large hieroglyphic writing of the 
XVIIIth or XlXth dynasty, and containing 
portions of Chapters 32, 33, 41, 42, 63, 77, 82, 
85-89, 98, 99, 105, and 121 of the Book of 
the Dead. 2 sheets. 



/ 



PAPYRUS No. XXVI 



A_N OTHER Papyrus, with a blank space left 
for the name of the purchaser to be inserted, 
written in large hieroglyphic writing of the 
XVIIIth or XlXth dynasty, and containing 
parts of Chapters of the Book of the Dead. 
In very bad preservation, but the remains of 
the vignettes show that it must once have 
been a magnificent document. 3 sheets. 



?< 



PAPYRUS No. XXVII. 



Papyrus of ^ ^ Heru, " Horus," written 
in very small hieroglyphic writing, and con- 
taining part of Chapter 77 of the Book of the 
Dead. The manuscript is much mutilated, 
and consists of a small roll 3 inches in height, 
and 16 fragments. XXVIth Dynasty (?). 

G 2 



( 52 ) 



>< 



/ 



)^ 



PAPYRUS 

Papyrus of 



No. XXVIII. 

Ta-de-nefer- 



hetep, " Ta-de-nefer-hetep," born of the ■q 
nebt-per, "Lady of the house/' c^ "^ _ njj 

Ta-relh-es, " Ta-rekh-es." It contains Chap- 
ter 18 of the Book of the Dead with the usual 
vignette. The writing is hieroglyphic, and 
nearly the same style as that of No. XXII (see 
PI. XXIII). 

The vignette is in outline only, without colour. 
1 page. 

Saitic. Height, lOg inches, by 7h inches in 
Avidth ; 1 9 inches long. 



PAPYRUS No. XXIX. 



Papyrus of the IV 
Amen, " Priest of Amen," 



ie;±i 



rteter hen ne 



lii^i^i 



iVe^'t- 



Amen, " Nesi-amen." Only some very roughly 
executed vignettes and the name of the owner 
of this manuscript are preserved. 1 page. 
36 inches long by 9 inches high, and numerous 
fragments. XXVI Dynasty. 



PAPYRUS No. XXX. 

Papybus of 1^ Ser, " Ser," born of ]| c.'^?' C^ 
Asl-urt, " Isis-urt," containing the vignette of 
Chapter 110 of the Book of the Dead. 1 page. 
15^ inches by 14 J inches high. XXVI Dynasty. 



PAPYRUS No. XXXI. 

Twenty-six fragments of linen, with Chapters 
13 (?) and 145, written for an individual named 
Nefer-Tum, in small cursive hieroglyphic 
characters. 



y^ PAPYRUS No. XXXII. 

Papyrus containing part of the vignette of 
Chapter 110. The name of the person for 
whom it was written is not preserved. There 
are two fragments : one measuring 8 inches 
wide by 7 inches high ; the other 7 inches 
wide by 5 inches high. 



7^ 



PAPYRUS No. XXXIIlA. 

Fragments of a papyrus containing certain 
chapters of the Book of the Dead written 
in hieroglyphs. 1 page and 23 fragments. 
XlXth Dynasty. 



X 



PAPYRUS No. XXXIIlB. 



Twenty fragments of another similar papyrus 
without name. XXth Dynasty. 



[h.) HIEEATIC. 
PAPYRUS No. XXXIV 

Papyrus of the (JiMJ^ij^si 






Ahy 



ne Amen-Ra, " Sistrum player of Amen-I\a," 
and '1 V p o j| hen neter Madt, " Priest of 

Maat," ^ ^ ^ ^^ P ^ Nes-pa-kher- 
taui-es, " Nes-pa-kher-taui-es." His mother's 
name was ]^JJP^ Ta-Khabes, " Ta- 
Khabes," but the father's name is not preserved. 
Parts of Chapters 7, 9, 12, 15, 27, 28, 125, 145, 
146, 148, 149 (a, e), 150, 151, 152, 154, 157, 
159, 161-165, are preserved. The texture 
of this papyrus is exceptionally fine, and the 
writing, a small and neat hieratic, is very good. 
XXIInd Dynasty. 



■^. PAPYRUS No. XXXV. 
(PLATE XXIV.) 

P.P.KO. Of the If j.(i=Si^q>i':i 

hen neter ne Amen-e.m-apt, "Priest of Amen- 



( 53 ) 



in-Karnak/' ^if^fl "^^"^^ Heru- 
nesti-utef-ef, " Hor-nesti-atef-ef," son of the 
I hen neterne Khensu, "Priest 



of Khonsu/' ^ ""^^ "L^ ^ S ^ Heru-sheiehh- 
heru-nest, " Hor-shetekh-hor-nest," by the 
^l)|(j(j^7^.^(|^^ neU per dhyt re 
Amen, "Ladj of the house and chantress 
of Amen," T Nefer-hetep, " Nefer- 

hetep." Hor-nesti-atef-ef also held the follow- 
ing titles in addition to that of Priest of 
Amen-in-Karnak : — 

1 1 ^^ ^ ^•''^^ neter Heru, " Priest of Horus." 
I V ' "^ 1 e J) he7i neter ne Khensu, 



" Priest of Khonsu." 

hen neter ne Ast, 



'ItJ 

of Isis." 



Priest 



|y' S'^y hen neter nc Anup, "Priest of 
Anubis." 

y I u h'^fi' h^', " Servant of the wlilte crown." 

Tills magnificent papyrus is written in the 
small hieratic character of the XXIInd dynasty, 
and is elaborately illustrated with vignettes, 
one of them being brilliantly coloured. It is 
not complete, only about fourteen pages being 
in the Amherst Collection. It originally 
measured about 16 feet in length ; the height 
of the papyrus being 1 foot 6 inches. The 
first part, contaniiug about 30 chapters, is 
preserved iu the British Museum (No. 10,037 
[Salt 829]).* These chapters are 1-9, 12, 15- 



• In the Catalogue of Vie Collection of Egyptian Anti- 
quities, the propei-tij of the lute Ilennj Salt, Esq. (London, 
1S3;>), p. 64), this papyrus is described as "a magnificent 
and perfect document in hieratic character, ornamented 
with numerous figures most delicately executed in black 
.... It is 18 inches wide and about 16 feet iu length. 
From Thebes." 



21, 23, 24, 26, 33-38, 40, 42, 48, and 49. The 
Amherst pieces contain Chapters 110 a. 111, 
113, 114 a, 115, 117-120, 121 (the begiiming 
only), 122, 125 (the end only, 11. 58-69), 125 d, 
126, 128, 129, 132, 135, 137, 138, 148 b, 152, 
154, 155, 157-159, 159 his, and 101. 

Period : XXIInd dynasty. 8 feet long by 
1 foot 6 inches hio-h. 



/-■ PAPYRUS No. XXXVI. 

Papyrus of || ^^ y^ ^ ^ Tahud - scdem, 
" Tahuti-sedem," son of the Lady Ij h ^^^^ 3 
Thamen, " Tha-Amen." It is written in small 
hieratic characters, and contains parts of 
Chapters 1, 7, 11, 15, 16, and 18. 1 page 
and 10 fragments. Grseco-Koman period. 



PAPYRUS No. XXXVII. 

Papyrus of p ^^ |j ^ Se-rd-iaui, " Se-ra-taui," 
son of the Lady ri^'^^* '^^ J Ast-urt, "'Ast-urt,'' 
a sistrum player of Amen-lla. 27 fragments. 



XXIInd Dvnastv. 



X 



PAPYRUS No. XXXVIII 



4 



.(|=, 



hen neter ne 



Papyrus of the \ 

Amen, "Priest of Amen," ^ ^] e (] 

i] cr^ w. Nesi-su-Amen-em-dpt, " Nesi-su- 

Amen-em-apt." It is written in the hieratic 

writing of the XXIInd dynasty, and contains 

the greater part of Chapter No. 1, with a 

mutilated vignette depicting the deceased. 

3 pages. 26 inches, by 10 iuclies high. [Lek 

Catalogue, 431.] Grseco-Roman period. 



( 54 ) 



PAPYRUS No. XXXIX. 



Paptbus of au i| ^ ^^ *^^ --v^ (] ^ ^ o ^ dhy nc 
Amen-Rd, "slstrom player of Amen-Ra," 
whose name is unfortunately destroyed. It 
is written in the small hieratic of the XXVIth 
dynasty. [Lee, Catalogue, 435.] 



X 



PAPYRUS No. XL. 



Paptkus containing some chapters of the 
Book of the Dead in a very careless and 
cursive hieratic, too illegible to read. Roman. 

[Lee, Catalogue, 430.] 



y 



PAPYRUS No. XLI. 



Y., 



CiiAPTEK 57 of the Book of the Dead, written 
in very cursive hieiatic upon a piece of mummy 
cloth. [Lee, Catalogue, No. 437.] 






PAPYRUS No. XLII. 



^ 



Papyrus written in hieratic writing, apparently 
containing a part of a Chapter of the Book of 
the Dead. Height 10 inches, length 19g inches. 
[Gliddon.] 



G. DEMOTIC PAPYEI. 



PAPYRUS No. XLIII. 

Two fragments of a demotic papyrus written 
in the small character of the later Ptolemaic 
period. The fragments measure : No. 1, Sh 
inches long by 8 inches high. ISo. 2, 4^ inches 
long by 5^^ inches high. 



PAPYRUS No. XLIV. 
Eight small fragments of demotic writing. 



PAPYRUS No. XLV. 

Fkagments of a demotic papyrus, apparently 
a record of some accounts. 3 columns. 20 
inches long by 10 inches high. 



( 55 ) 



H. DEMOTIC A]S"D GEEEK PAPYEL 



The following twenty papyri (Xos. XLVI- 
LXYI), several of which are dated in the second 
and first century B.C., were found together in 
an earthen jar near Thebes. One of them is 
written in Greek uncials and three others in 
Demotic with Greek dockets : the remaining 
sixteen are written in Demotic only. The 
Demotic texts have not yet been examined, but 
they will form the subject of another volume. 
The Greek texts have been translated by 
Mr. B. P. Grenfell, from which translations 
the general character of the documents may 
be gathered. They were no doubt preserved 
as the title deeds of the property to which 
they refer. 



PAPYRUS No. XLVI. 

Demotic contract with a Greek docket, con- 
cerning certain taxes upon property, dated 
11th day of Phaneroth in the XXXIst year of 
Ptolemy Euergetes II (Physcon), i.e., 139 B.C. 



PAPYRUS No. XLVII. 

Demotic contract with a Greek docket, con- 
cerning certain taxes upon property, dated 
Srd day of Pachon in the Ilird year of 
Ptolemy Soter II (Lathyrus), i.e. 114 B.C. 



the 16th day of Mecheir in the fifth year of 
Ptolemy [Soter II (Lathyrus)], i.e., 112 b.c. 




PAPYRUS No. XLVill. 



PAPYRUS No. XLIX. 

Papyrus written in Greek uncials, containing 
copies of official documents relating to certain 
taxes upon projoerty. One of the documents 
contained in it is dated the 8th day of Choiach, 
in the Vlth year of Cleopatra III and Ptolemy 
Soter II, i.e., 112 B.C. 



PAPYRUS No. L. 

Demotic contract with docket also in demotic 
writing. Height of papyrus 12^ inches, length 
of roll 20 inches. 



PAPYRUS No. LI. 

Demotic contract with docket also in demotic 
writing. Height of papyrus 12 inches, length 
of roll 6 inches. 



PAPYRUS No. Lll. 

Demotic contract. Height of papyrus 11| 
inches, length of roll 38 inches. 



PAPYRI Nos. LIII-LXV. 



Fourteen papyri of various sizes written in 
demotic, found together with Papyri Nos. 

Demotic contract with a Greek docket, con- j XLVI-LII, and probably relating to the same 

cerning certain taxes upon property, dated in | subject. Ptolemaic, 



( 56 ) 



I. GEEEK PAPYRI. 



PAPYRUS No. LXVI. I PAPYRUS No. LXVIII. 

Fragments of a letter relating to the sale of Fragment of a contract. Circa 5th cen- 
a house. Circa 1st century B.C. j tury a.d. 



PAPYRUS No. LXVII. 



PAPYRUS No. LXIX. 



Fragment of a letter written in a very cursive Page of accounts written in a very cursive 
character. Circa 5th century A.j>. \ character. Circa 8th century a.d. 



J. COPTIC PAPYRI. 



PAPYRUS No. LXX. 

Fragment of a letter found in the Fayum. 
Circa 900 a.d 



PAPYRUS No. LXXI. 



PAPYRUS No. LXXII. 

Will of Tsible, the daughter of Gapatios, 
written probably in the Vlllth century a.d. 
Mr. W. B, Crum has transcribed this document 
and translated it in full. His transcription, 
translation and notes are given as an appendix 



Fragment of a letter found in the Faylim. to the present volume. [See page 59.] 
Circa 900 a.d. 



K. COPTIC AND ARABIC PAPYRI. 



PAPYRI Nos. LXXIII-LXXVII. 



PAPYRUS No. LXXVIII. 



Five letters written on the recto in Coptic and 1 Two small fragments containing accounts 
on the verso in Arabic. Circa 900 a.d. ! written in Arabic. Circa 1000 a.d. 



APPENDIX. 



PAPYRUS No. LXXII, 



W. E. CRUM, M.A. 



( 59 ) 



>< 



COPTIC PAPYRUS. 



•^-X^ 



Composed of eight selides, in all 43f in. long 
by 6^ in. wide. The text is written upon the 
horizontal fibres in a clumsy, ligatureless hand, 
probably of the eighth century. It consists of 
one of those numerous legal documents — over a 
hundred are at present known, — once deposited 
in the monastery of St. Phoebamon at 'Abd 
el-kurnah, the Jeme of the Copts and their 
ancestors, the Castrum Memnonium of the 
Byzantines, — and now dispersed among the 
European museums. These documents fall 
for the most part into two groups ; they are 
either dedications of children by their parents 
to the service of the monastery, or wills, sales 
and other declarations regarding ownership or 
inheritance. The present papyrus belongs to 
the latter group. It is written, like all the 
similar texts, in the Sa'idic dialect, with a 
heavy proportion of words drawn from the 
Greek documents upon which the Coptic legal 
terminology was modelled. The orthography 
of the whole is remarkably inaccurate. 

The very unsystematic pointing of the original 
has been omitted in the following transcript ; 
the spelling has not been corrected, and "sic" 
has been added at only a few points. 

^ gjAAnp^Lit itneicux AXttitcgHpe j«.itRemti. 

exo-r^-i-S 2,ju».Tiooif n^oo**' execonrxoTXHne 

sic ? 

ruw-ecoTpH rtxertxepojULne nxcoxeKi,xec 
5 rtxeK2iii.rtoc rti-g^pn ^XIJl«.eICJox^.xoc | Xeott- 

7 

xioc Ju.njLfl.Hiti. ttX-LcyttiT nnK^-cxpoit xaxne 
&.n.oK xcsS-Xe^ xojHpe ertv^-nA-Xioc^ xeenixe 
,&.i2jHe -i-^p^i ^.Tcyoorte eqg,oce ^.ip^^oxe 
xeJULimoxe itxenrtonrxe cgme ncuui nx<Lei 
ioi.&oX 2*""e|^ioc nxi.Ko nn-Lg^ajJ^ eqto 



ni.nHexort juLnT<Lnpu3ccl)0pi. * A.j['f]ni.o'ri,! 
<i.2iii,2ii4LeHKe ertA.xiii.p«i.fi.e ruu-oc mrr- 
cy^Xec e^oX enep£,ooTro 2^e x-sjxpo njuioc 
2^ixn 2,itJULeitxpH erti.j;ioiiicxoc | ^.ttuj is 
jutrtovpeqcgji.! expeqc^^i g^i.poo'* epe- 
ni-gjHX cJu.o«x ei^^JULooc ^jixrtnAJUL^Lnen- 
Koxe epenA.noc cjuLonex epenA.XorecjuLoc 
xi.xpeT i,ipg,oxe xeJULHnoXH nxex-s.no- 
4>.i.cic XA-gjOi 2^a)x nee | npcjojuue niju. K.LXA.ao 
OH nxA-nnoirxe nXovoc gjiop^-^e njuLoc 
ixnneneiujx 2^Hpen /^■h.i.xx. xenxKo-sfKA-g, 

sic 
SKn<LKOXeK i^XlKl.^ i-IXmA-OTA.! 2^I2^IA.eHKe 

eS-oXxei-ig^ue eni.2,i.i eqnpocexH ^poi 
^!tnA.2,ice XHpeq | ^.ttoj eqc{)oXoKi.pe A-poias 
g,nju.nxKA.TA. * niJifl. eq©A.Xne njtxoi £,nxeq- 
(ToAJt xHpec A.IXOOC iceju.Hno'vxe enxen- 
no-ifxe xnoi 2>ineq£uJU!.<t. ex^^i-g^oxe ex- 
fieneq^jice JU.nx«i-npoc4)opi. xeno-irvH -f kh- 
Xeve nxeg^H | exfi.eneqxoo-if nxepjuiHceion* so 
epeni.2,<Li n<L&ixoif neqxi.A.if nnpocct)opA. 
2,A.poi ^.'iiu on niJu.epoc enni nxi-qei A.2fU3i 
£,i.nA.eiujx Ju.nniJw.Hpoc neiuj^B.epfi.cjoxe ^ 
epeni-g^ij ni-cytone qto nxoeic epooT eqn*.- 
iciTeifl'fju.H nxoxq nni-cnni^ neqxi.cs5 
nnopocc{)opi. £,A.poi &.fuo on ex^enecKenfe 
nxi.ifei i.[xu3i 2^]A.nA.eia)x eiujpeK nnnoTfx[e» 
ni.nx]otKpi.xu3p xeJU-ei-fXi-Tre nni-g^A.! 
n^^Hxcir nneX<LTfe npa)ju.e ectj<rX«.<rbju. enei 
<l|6oX i-poK cyi,<&.n(:-2, e£,i.Xi.-re nnpoc()A.cic 4o 
n2iiju.eme onrxe con orxe ccone o-vxe 
p(joJu.e ^tjSKec entome onrxe nxoK oixe 



( 60 ) 



itexnKT THpoif juLrtrtctuK K^rt Tmonr Ki-it 

*^ aj<j.o-)foeicy itijut nex | it^.xaoXjuLi, enA.pifi^e 

n2i!2iiieKKe ovxe cyxstAJLto onrxe ptojL8.e 

enujine exftex^-npoci^oTfpi. JutitnA-rt^cy 

itxi-iopeKHq i-XXi. epeni.^^.1 itA-cyuune eqoj 

nxoesc ^.xttx^.^poc4)op^. "XHpec g^iteoxe 

50 I nnrto-ifxe eqitA-Tinfce ruxoc xenneXz.te 

itpuuJULe eojcDtjLcroxjL rtxsHKe kjuloc itci.^eX- 

Xnq eitJopeK rmrtovxe ^^.ttxo'rKp^,x(Jop xe 

■ Xi.ifs eitA.pxort mxK ^\K^^^^^\^.e gjiTHnoc 

65 itijuL eq2,ieiooTf | eTfoocgex n<Lq eqnA.xu3- 

sic 

juieq 1'^ A2^j2!.ieHKe expeqg^^pagj z.poc K^.T^- 
©H eTCHgj xeeH^icTi it^.s expi-pixeixeg^rti-j 
2^juLnsxena)me nexrti.xa)XAJL^. enA.p<i,E.e 

60 itAjLoc itcyopen XKen rttte | nexJts-gJt.^.'s- xig^Hv 
rtX/Le ^.XXi ncyopen m-Hnoc^^ AJLKit eqrt<L- 
cyoane eqo) rtaj.M.JUto eni-ni-cy ex[o]'5fi-i-^ 
eT[o'»a(jtfi.]aje n<Lq nescwx [jLR.]rtrtajKpe jutrt- 
nttA.T[jta,]^. exo'if^.^.^ i-nfo? ort equA-i" nXovoc 

65 1 rtojoJULex e[n]oitTiA. ^" ititoB. rtecA.nHxe 
itJUL[o]q g,«xeqg^mocx^LClc jutrtitccoc rtcen^.- 
p^-CKe-ife^e itJULoq xi-peqgjOun A-XCrbjts. nxi- 
2iiieuKe JULrtxciJUL5<4, ^^ nnXA.cyi.ite nnKHpoc 

70 exAJUULA^Tf XI 1 2v!A-©HKe oTfit ecrt«Lcyu3ne 
ecxA.xpH['y] 

iic 

A-itoK xc!S.Xe xertXA.ccypncgjA.1 xne 
cxHXH A.xj2s.iA.eHKe JULitgjUj^ nnxR. 
eqcH£, A.poc eKoxeA^vonrocyec A.poi a.!coxjulc 
75 ejutenxpjULttfCHJUte j A-nrto on A.mA.pA.KA.Xe 
no-ypeqcg,*.! Juing^enKovAJLnxpe expeJU(.A.p- 
XHpec©A.i gjA-poi A.IKOC A.^oX toe npujKexH + 

.pi*A.noK A.nxpeA.c ncyape jtJLnju!.A.KA.pioc 
({>o^A.juL(Jon -few xJLAxnxpe 
so -f A-noK [ve]a5pvioc ncynpe xjlujjl&x^ ca,[xjl- 
o'lfJuX "f oj JULAJinxpe 

.p i.noK,^|ncyHpe JULnAJi.A.K, iI^A-n -foo 
jut.jL«.nxpe 



A.noK . eco . icxoc n<i.nA.rrta)cxHc nA.n«L 

K-yp5A.K0C ^^ A.IC2,A.I gjA-pCJUO-C 85 

xe I JULeY noi ncg^A.! + 

-f A.noK ceTHpoc nojHpe nnx«.A.K<Lpeioc 
cAJULonraX A.icg^A.i nxexi<LeHKe nxA.(rix 
npoc XKxicic nnexcAJLine njutoc + 



Translation. 

In the name of the Father and tlie Son and the 
Holy Ghost (wvev/Ma) ! Upon tliis day, which is 
the 25th day of Mesore, in this year of the 12th 
(BaiBeKaTOs:) Indiction (ivBikticov); before the 
most honourable (jifiioiTaTO'i) \ Leontios and s 
Mena, magistrates of the township (KaaTpov) 
Jeme; 

I, Tsibl^, the daughter of Gapatios, since (eireiSij) 
I have fallen into a serious (lit. troublesome) 
malady, I have been afraid lest (yu,7;7roTe) God 
should seek after me and I should depart out of 
t'liis I hfe (/S«o?) and leave my jDroperty uncared- lo 
fur ij-ead airpovo-qTO'i) and my offering (■7rpoa(f>opa), 
I have had recourse (therefore) to this testament 
{hiaOrjicri), untransgressable (Trara/Saiveiv), in- 
dissoluble ; (and) we (sic) have further con- 
firmed it by means of trustworthy (a^ioTriaTo<;) 
witnesses, | and with a scribe to write on their 15 
behalf; (and this) while my mind is fixed, as I 
sit upon my bed, my irnderstanding (vov;) being 
steadfast and my reason (Xoyiafio<;) firm. For I 
was afraid lest (fiij-iroTe) the decree (aT7o^acn<;) 
reach me also, like | all men, even as (Kara) 20 
God the Word (X070?) enjoined upon our com- 
mon father, Adam, saying, Earth art thou ; to 
the earth shalt thou return. 

I have had recourse to this testament (BiaOrjKr)) 
because I have recognized that my husband 
devotes himself (vpotreyeiv) to me in all my 
business | and looks to my iutei'est (<f)iXoKaX€iv) 2s 
in all service, cherishing (OaX-n-eiv) me with all 
his power. (And) I said, lest God question me 
at his fearful tribunal (^-r^fia) concerning his 
(i.e., my husband's) trouble and my offering 
(irpoa^opa) ; 

So (ye) now I do order (KeXeveiv) in this wise | re- so 
gardiug the four trimesia (rpifirjcnov) ; my hus- 
band shall take them and shall give them as an 
offering (vpoa-(f>opa) on my behalf. And more- 
over, my portion (fiepo^) of a house, that canle 
to me from my father, and my portion (p,epos:) 



( 61 ) 



of a — ? field, my husband sh^.lI be master of 
35 them ; he shall get their | price (rifir]) from my 

brethren and shall give it as an offering (irpoa- 
<f)opa). And further, as to the chattels (a-Kewj) 
which have come to me from my father, I swear 
to God Almighty {TravTOKparap) that I will not 
give {or, am not giving) anything of them to my 
husband. 
40 There shall no man ever have power to sue | thee 
upon any pretext (Trpo^ao-t?), as follows ; 
neither (oure) brother nor {ovre) sister nor (ovre) 
any relative {lit. man) at all (oXw?) of mine ; 
neither (oure) thee nor {ovTe) any of those that 
come after thee, whether {Kav) it be now or 

45 {Kav) at any time. He that | shall dare {roXfiav) 

to transgress {irapa^aweiv) this testament {hia- 
drjKT)), whether {ovre) stranger or relative {lit. 
man) of mine, concerning my offering {-Trpoa^opa) 
and the oath that I have sworn, — But {aWa) 
my husband shall be master over my whole 

50 offering {'jrpoacjyopa) in the fear | of God; he 

shall administer {BtoiKew) it, so that no man 
shall have power to administer {BioiKeiv) it 
excepting him. I conjure by God Almighty 
{iravTOKpuTcop) every govomor {apx'^v) and 

55 magistrate and every honom-able, | worshipful 

personage (tvtto?) who shall happen upon (?) 
this testament {BiaOrjKr]), that he keep it, ac- 
cording as {Kara) it is written that it is lawful 
{e^ea-Ti) for me to do what pleases me with 
mine own. 
He that shall dare {roXfiav) to transgress {irapa- 

60 ^atveiv) it, firstly ( + /j£v), that man shall | not 

prosper in anything ; but {aWa, fiev) in the first 
place (ti/tto?), he shall be estranged from the 
holy oath which men {lit. they) serve, (from) the 
Father, the Son and the Uoly Ghost {irvevfia) ; 

65 and also he shall pay the amount (Xoyo?) | of 

three ounces {oyyca) of gold and they shall 
receive {uTraireiv) it from his property (utto- 
araai'i). Afterwards they shall see to it {irapa- 
a-iceva^etv) that he conform to the authority of 
this testament {BcaOrjKT)) and the penalty {read 
eTTiTifica) of the magistrate of that time {xatpo';). 

70 This I testament {BiaOrjicv) therefore {ovv) shall 

be established. 

I, Tsibl6, that wrote above, do agree to {aroixeti') 
this testament {BiadrjKTj} and to ail things that 
are written in it ; for they have read it to me 
(and) I have heard it in the Egyptian (tongue). 
76 I And moreover I have called in {irapaKaXeiv) a 

scribe and witnesses besides, that they might 
bear witness {fiaprvpea-dai) for me (and) I have 
published it as it is set forth (ra? irpoKecrai,). 



I, Andreas, the son of the deceased (jjMKapio<;) 
Phoebamon, am witness. 



I I, GeorgioR, the son of the deceased (futKapi,o<;) so 

Samuel, am witness. 
I, — ?, the son of the deceased {fiaKapiot) Psan, 

am witness. 
I, Theopistos (?), the reader (avayv(oaTt]<;) of (the 

church of) Apa Kyriakos, have written for them, 

for I they know {voeiv) not (how) to write. 85 

I, Severus, the son of the deceased {pjxKapio^) 
Samuel, have written this testament {Biadr/Kt)) 
with my hand, at {vpo<;) the request (atxTjo-t?) of 
her who authorized it. 

Notes. 

1 Unfortunately none of the persons in this text — 
magistrates, witnesses, scribe, — recur in other similar 
MSS. Twelfth Indictions fall, e.g., in a.d. 729, 741, 
759, 774, 789. 

3 XClfiXe occurs also in the 2nd Boulak papyrus. 
Cf. Bodleian, MS. Copt. (P), c. 4, XClfi-HX. 

3 Read perhaps ItA.ni.:^IOC, a frequent name. 

♦ The npOc4>OpA. consists in these testa of the 
person of the child to be dedicated, of the jjerson of the 
testator himself, of cattle, palm-trees, or, as here, of 
money. 

5 For juLnxfTiLTfort. 

^ The Tptfiijatov was the 3rd of the I'o/uaaa, (solidus, 
^.oXoKoTTmoc.) 

7 A word of uncertain meaning; v. Aeg. Zeilschr., 18C9, 
131. 

8 "From my brethren" was inserted later, above the 
line. 

» There is not space in the gap for two n 's {cf. 1. 52). 
1" A word of doubtful meaning; v. Aeg. Zeilschr., 1871, 
46. 

II Cf. the corresponding Greek expression s-ptcTOTvvu'f. 
13 The ounce (since Justinian) = ^\ of 72 solidi (1 libra), 

i.e. = G solidi. 

IS No doubt this is the extra penalty, cViTi/ii'n, of Brit. 
Mus., Or, 4868, 4871, 4872, &c. 

1* LI. 78-85 are in the hand of the "scribe" whom 
Tsible had engaged (I. 15). 

15 This church is mentioned in Urit. Mus., Or. 1061 C, 
and Pap. 105 {Rev. eg. I, 101). 



LIST OF PLATES. 



I. Early Literary Fragments. 

II, III. The Lee Papyrus. 

IV-VII. The Amherst Papyrus. 

VIII-XIV. The Harris Papyrus A. 

XV-XVIII. The Fayum Papyrus. 

XIX-XXI. The Astarte Papyrus. 

XXI. Fragments of an Account Papyrus. 

XXII. The Papyrus of Khay. 

XXIII. The Papyrus of Ped-hor. 

XXIV. The Papyrus of Hor-nest-atef-ef. 



TUE AMHERST COLLECTION. 



1' I. A T I- 1 . 






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Plate VIII. 








t^imff^u(fe=^J^^'i^fVw^^ 









THE HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (I). 



The Amherst Collection. 



Plate IX. 


















THE HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (ID. 



The Amherst Collection. 



Plate X. 



• ad 










THE HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (III). 



The Amherst Collection. 



Plate XI. 







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THE HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (IV). 



The Amherst Collection. 



Plate XII. 



*t^^SVni!pf^cC^ 



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l(^^^fffftk\&inlL^m Vail . 



THE HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (V). 



The Amherst Collection. 











THE HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (VI). 



The Amherst Collection. 



Plate XIV. 




yx>r^ 







VII. 



the HARRIS PAPYRUS A. (VII & VIII). 



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Plate XXII. 



THE AMHEEST COLLECTION. 







t*?. Tur I _ir»" - 




E»^s 



THE PAI'VIUS OF KHAY 



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^^':j|^^^%^:f¥'^M\"'Ni^i<'"<'^i;^Ws*^^|j-^'^iH 









THK AMHEUST CuLLECTiuN. 



Plate WIV 











sit 




TlIK I'AI'VUIS OF UOK-XEST-ATEF-EF. 



BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 



3 1197 20355 9650 



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